Bachelor of Business Administration

BACHELOR'S DEGREE IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

1 Programme Aims

The main aim of the Bachelor of Business Administration   is to turn out graduates with very broad scope of knowledge and skills from the areas of business studies in general whiles emphasizing Human Resource Management, Accounting and Financial Management, Entrepreneurship and Logistics and Supply Chain Management in the final stages of the programme. The aim is to ensure that the graduate has competencies that enable him/her to fit well into various job situations confidently, including setting up and managing their own businesses, whiles having a thorough grounding in aspects of Human Resource Management, Accounting and Financial Management, Entrepreneurship and Logistics and Supply Chain Management practice. It is envisaged that graduates would have sound academic knowledge and skills as well as the required professional competencies for jobs in Business Administration in general and the fields of Human Resource Management, Accounting and Financial Management, Entrepreneurship and Logistics and Supply Chain Management in particular.

In view of current international developments, especially for Ghana which is surrounded by French speaking countries, and in order to develop the capability of the graduates to explore job opportunities in and around Ghana, the programme is designed to ensure all students acquire working knowledge and skills competencies in French and English in Levels 100 and 200 (L100 and L200).

The programme will impart relevant work experience to graduates during the four (4) years of training and education by ensuring that practical training, industrial attachment, internship, business seminars etc. are mandatory. Special collaborations will be forged with relevant public, private and non-governmental organizations so as to facilitate the practical training for the students.

 6.2 PROGRAMME Objectives

The specific objectives of the Bachelor of Business Administration (BBA)   are to:

  • Facilitate the acquisition of relevant knowledge, skills and attitudes required in business administration in general and Human Resource Management, Accounting and Financial Management, Entrepreneurship and Logistics and Supply Chain Management in particular so as to function effectively in the world of work.
  • Enable students situate Human Resource Management, Accounting and Financial Management, Entrepreneurship and Logistics and Supply Chain Management theories, principles and practices in the organizational development context and the specific roles that this function plays in achieving corporate goals and objectives.
  • Enable students integrate the Human Resource Management, Accounting and Financial Management, Entrepreneurship and Logistics and Supply Chain Management knowledge with other core areas of business administration to develop the key competencies for either starting or managing small businesses.
  • Develop high ethically conscious professionals in business administration coupled with acumens in leadership that is required to lead business transformation and socio-economic development in Ghana.
  • Train students to acquire strategic thinking capacity in the core functional areas of Business Administration so as to develop their problem-solving capacities as they enter businesses and organisations for work.
  • Prepare the students for opportunities in entry-level positions in dynamic work environments and for academic advancement in Business Administration.
  • Students’ admission, progression and graduation:

Clearly state the policies on minimum qualifications for admission into the programme, retention and graduation.

  1. Entry Requirements:

SSSCE Holders

Six (6) Credit passes or better including core English, Mathematics and either Integrated Science or Social Studies and three (3) electives in relevant subjects. Applicants should have an aggregate score of 6-24 in the West Africa Examination Council Examinations (Credit Passes (A-D) in six (6) subjects comprising three core subjects, including English language and Mathematics, plus three (3) relevant elective subjects).

WASSCE Applicants                                                      

Six (6) Credit passes or better including core English, Mathematics and either Integrated Science or Social Studies and three (3) electives in relevant subject. Applicant should have an aggregate score of 6 – 36 in the West Africa Examination Council Examinations (Credit Passes (A1-C6) in six (6) subjects comprising three core subjects, including English language and Mathematics, plus three (3) relevant elective subjects.)

GBCE Applicants

Credit passes (A-D) in six (6) subjects comprising three core subjects including English Language and Mathematics plus three (3) relevant elective subjects.  

A’ Level Holders

Five (5) Credit passes in GCE “O” Level Examination, including English Language and Mathematics and three (3) “A” Level passes in relevant subjects. A pass in the General paper required. Successful candidates for Business Administration and information Technology will be placed at Level 200. (Passes in three (3) subjects (at least, one of the passes should be grade D or better). Also, the applicant must have had credit passes (Grade 6) in five (5) GCE Ordinary level subjects including English Language, Mathematics and a science subject (for none-science students) and an Arts subject ( for science students)).

ABCE Applicants

Full Diploma Certificate in ABCE: The applicant must have had credit passes in five (5) subjects including English Language, Mathematics, Integrated Science or Social Studies in the General Business Certificate Examination (GBCE) or Senior Secondary School Certificate Examination (SSSCE) or West African Senior Secondary School Certificate Examination (WASSCE). ABCE candidates may be considered for admission at level 200 of the degree programme.

HND Holders

HND Holders with first class or second class upper desiring a top up in the same discipline shall be admitted to level 300. HND holders with second class lower or third class, regardless of discipline or those changing disciplines (regardless of the class obtained), shall be admitted into level 200. (Applicants must have graduated with a good HND certificates (i.e. at least second class lower division). In addition, the applicant must have acquired a 2-year post-HND qualification working experience).

Professional Certificate Holders

Applicants with following professional qualification shall be given direct admission to level 300:

  • Institute of Chartered Secretaries and Administration (ICSA) Professional Level
  • Institute of Human Resource Management Practitioners Ghana (IHMRP) Professional Level
  • Applicants with following professional qualification shall be given direct admission to Level 200:
  • Institute of Chartered Secretaries and Administration (ICSA) Level One (1)
  • Institute of Human Resource Management Practitioners Ghana (IHRMP) Level One (1)
  • Chartered Institute of Administrators and Management Consultants (CIAMC) Part III

Mature Students 

MIUC also enrols matured students with work experience as follows:

  1. The applicant must be at least 25 years old, and show proof of age with birth certificate or any legitimate documentary proof of date of birth which is at least 5 years old at the time of application; 
  2. All applicants must pass Mature Students’ Entrance Examinations conducted by MIUC in (English Language, Mathematics and an Aptitude Test) for entry into all programmes at all level 100;  
  3. The applicant should show proof of passes in English Language and Mathematics in WASSCE
  4. Any other standard High School level examinations (for qualifications from countries outside WAEC’s aegis should be referred to the National Accreditation Board (NAB) for determination of equivalences and eligibility for admission.

FOREIGN QUALIFICATIONS

All foreign qualifications should be referred to the National Accreditation Board (NAB) for determination of equivalences and eligibility for admission to tertiary institutions in Ghana (National Accreditation Board Act, 2007 {Act744(2(2b)}).

Applicants may be invited to write an entrance examination and to attend a selection interview.

  1. Progression

Candidates may progress through the programme and complete successfully by passing all required courses and final Project Work. Generally, a student shall be put on probation for one year if he/she scores C grade in more than three (3) courses at any stage of the programme.  Candidates would be made to retake those courses.   If a student fails a course, he or she will have an opportunity to repeat the course. Failing the three (3) courses after retake will lead to dismissal. In all cases the student will be credited with the new grade after retake if he/she scores a better grade.

  1. Graduation

A student cannot be considered as having completed the programme if he or she has outstanding re-takes or has not fulfilled all other academic and financial requirements.  The requirements for graduation are as follows:

  • A final grade point average (FGPA) of at least 1.75.
  • Submission of three (3) copies of the Long Essay / Project Reports to the appropriate Co-ordinator of the School.
  • Completed a minimum of 120 credit hours over the 8 semesters.
  • All requirements for the programme will typically be completed within eight (8) continuous semesters. An extension of two semesters (in extenuating and special cases, a maximum of 4 semesters) is subject to approval by the Academic Board.
  1. Degree Awarded
  • Employment:

List the areas in which the students are likely to be employed

  • Private Sector (Local companies, multinational companies etc.)
  • Industry, Business, Commerce
  • Third Sector (Non-governmental organizations)
  • International Organizations (e.g., UNO, AU and their branches)
  • Public Sector (Government Ministries, agencies)
  • Graduates are also trained to start their own enterprises.
  • Consultations:

State the levels of consultations for the design of the programme including consultations with the appropriate professional and/or relevant supervisory body where applicable

  • GIMPA Business School
  • Institute of Chartered Secretaries and Administration (ICSA) Ghana .
  • Institute of Human Resource Practitioners Ghana
  • Chartered Institute of Administrators and Management Consultants (CIAMC)
  • Components of the programme:

Provide details of the curriculum and mode of delivery to include the following:

Each student must complete a programme of study made up of a minimum of forty-two (44) courses in four major components. Each course is allocated 3 credit hours except French I to French IV which have two (2) credit hours each and the Integrated Business Simulation which is allocated 1 credit hour. Each Credit hour represents the number of hours of contact (for teaching or supervision) between the lecturer and the student weekly for the entire semester including examination periods. Students are required to take all 44 courses (a minimum of 120 credits) over the eight (8) semesters to graduate.

Coding and numbering of courses of the BBA Programme

All courses in this programme use a combination of letters followed by numbers to create course codes. Codes beginning with four letters and followed by three digits.

The letters of the courses are as follows:

SPRC – School of PPED Required Course    

GBEC – General Business Education Course

HRCC – Human Resource Concentration Course

FMCC – Accounting and Financial Management Concentration Course

ETCC – Entrepreneurship Management Concentration Course

PTCC – Logistics and Supply Chain Management Concentration Course   

The first digit in the three sub-code refers to the academic level in which the course is offered. The third digit in the number code shall be defined as odd number for a course offered in the first semester and even number for a course offered in the second semester of the academic level under consideration.

 

Component 1

School of PPED Required Courses–SPRC –
11 Courses

29 Credits

SPRC101    

Learning
Skills I

3 Credits

SPRC102   

Learning
Skills II

3 Credits

SPRC103

French
I

2 Credits

SPRC104    

French
II

2 Credits

SPRC105    

Introduction
to Social Psychology

3 Credits

SPRC106         

Introduction
to Philosophy and Critical Thinking

3 Credits

SPRC201      

French
III

2 Credits

SPRC202    

French
IV

2 Credits

SPRC203     

Organisational
Behaviour

3 Credits

SPRC301

Research
Methods

3 Credits

SPRC302

Total
Quality Management

3 Credits

Component 2

Core
Business Courses – GBEC – 25 Courses

76 Credits

GBEC101

Principles
of Economics (Micro & Macro)

3 Credits

GBEC102

Economy
of Ghana

3 Credits

GBEC103

Business
Mathematics

3 Credits

GBEC104    

Computer
Skills

3 Credits

GBEC201 

Quantitative
Methods for Business

3 Credits

GBEC202

Human
Resource Management

3 Credits

GBEC203

Principles
of Accounting I

3 Credits

GBEC204

Principles
of Accounting II

3 Credits

GBEC205

Principles
of Management

3 Credits

GBEC206

Principles
of Public Administration

3 Credits

GBEC208

Business
Law

3 Credits

GBEC301

Managerial
Economics

3 Credits

GBEC302    

Entrepreneurship

3 Credits

GBEC303

Marketing
Management

3 Credits

GBEC304

Managerial
Accounting

3 Credits

GBEC305

Operations
Management

3 Credits

GBEC306

Management
Information Systems

3 Credits

GBEC307     

Company
Law

3 Credits

GBEC308

Project
Management

3 Credits

GBEC401    

Financial
Management

3 Credits

GBEC402

Integrative
Business Simulation

1  Credit

GBEC403

Business
Planning

3 Credits

GBEC404

Performance
Management

3 Credits

GBEC405

Ethics
& Social Responsibility

3 Credits

GBEC406

Leadership

3 Credits

GBEC407

Strategic
Management

3 Credits

 

Component
3: CONCENTRATION AREA COURSES – ELECTIVES

HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT

Concentration Area
Courses – 6 courses

15 Credits

ACCOUNTING AND
FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT

Concentration Area
Courses – 6 courses

15 Credits

HRCC301

Training
and Development

3 Credits

FMCC301

Investment
and Portfolio Management

3 Credits

HRCC302

Recruitment
and Selection                                                        

3 Credits

FMCC302

Monetary
and Financial Systems                                                        

3 Credits

HRCC401

Employment
and Labor Law

3 Credits

FMCC401

Public
Finance

3 Credits

HRCC402

Human
Resource Development

3 Credits

FMCC402

Financial
Statement Analysis

3 Credits

HRCC404

Strategic
Human Resource Management

3 Credits

FMCC404

International
Trade Finance

3 Credits

 

 ENTREPRE-NEURSHIP

Concentration Area
Courses – 6 courses

12 Credits

 Logistics and Supply Chain Management

Concentration Area
Courses – 6 courses

15 Credits

ETCC301

Entrepreneurship
2: Managing Innovation

3 Credits

PTCC301

Public Procurement & Proc. Act 

3 Credits

ETCC302

Entrepreneurship
3: Key Skills for Business                                                        

3 Credits

PTCC302

Strategic
Supply Chain Management                                                        

3 Credits

HRCC401

Employment
and Labor Law

3 Credits

PTCC401

National
and International Negotiation

3 Credits

ETCC402

Entrepreneurship
5: Managing Businesses for High-Growth

3 Credits

PTCC402

International
Procurement

3 Credits

ETCC404

Entrepreneurship
6: Corporate Social Responsibility and Sustainable Business

3 Credits

PTCC404

e-Procurement
and e-Supply Chain

3 Credits

Component 4

Research Project – 2 Courses

6 Credits

GBEC409

Long Essay I /    Project I

3 Credits    

GBEC410

Long Essay II / Project II

3 Credits    

 

 

 

 

Programme Total: 44 Courses

126 Credits

 

NB: Each Level 400 candidate is supposed to take one elective course from any other area of concentration in the second semester.                                                 

d.         Research component

An integral part of the programme is for students to take a course in research methods and use the skill in business problem solving. The research skills will also be applied in specific course to complete practical and theoretical assignments in specific courses.

e.         Practical training, industrial attachment, internship, clinical experience, etc.

Although not a requirement for the degree, students will be encouraged to seek experiential exercises throughout the course of the programme. 

  1. Semester-by-semester structure/schedule of course, showing the credit value of each course

Each course has a credit value of three (3) except for French I to French IV which have two (2) credits hours each, and the Integrated Business Simulation which accounts for 1 credit hour. Courses offered from semesters 1 through 4 courses are common for all students.    

 

Semester 1

14 Credits

Semester 2

14 Credits

SPRC101

Learning
Skills I

SPRC102

Learning
Skills II

SPRC103

French
I

SPRC104

French II

SPRC105

Introduction
to Social Psychology

SPRC106

Introduction
to Philosophy & Critical Thinking

GBEC101

Principles
of Economics (Micro & Macro)

GBEC102

Economy
of Ghana

GBEC103

Business
Mathematics

GBEC 104

Computer Skills

 

 

 

 

Semester 3

14 Credits

Semester 4

14 Credits

SPRC201                          

French
III

SPRC202     

French
IV

SPRC203

Organisational
Behaviour

GBEC202

Human
Resource Management

GBEC201 

Quantitative
Methods for Business

GBEC204

Principles
of Accounting II

GBEC203

Principles
of Accounting I

GBEC206

Principles
of Public Administration

GBEC205

Principles
of Management

GBEC208

Business
Law

 

 

 

 

Semester 5

18 Credits

Semester 6

18 Credits

SPRC301

Research Methods

SPRC302

Total
Quality Management

GBEC301            

Managerial Economics

GBEC302               

Entrepreneurship 1

GBEC303

Marketing Management

GBEC304

Managerial Accounting

GBEC305

Operations Management

GBEC306

Management
Information Systems

GBEC307

Company Law

GBEC308

Project Management

HUMAN
RESOURCES CONCENTRATION/ ELECTIVES

 

 

 

HRCC301

Training
and Development

HRCC302

Recruitment
and Selection

ACCOUNTING
AND FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT CONCENTRATION ELECTIVES

 

 

 

FMCC301

Investment
and Portfolio Management

FMCC302

Monetary
and Financial Systems

ENTREPRENEURSHIP
CONCENTRATION ELECTIVES

 

 

 

ETCC301

Entrepreneurship
2: Managing Innovation

ETCC302

Entrepreneurship
3: Key Skills for Business

LOGISTICS
AND SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT CONCENTRATION/ ELECTIVES

 

 

 

PTCC301

Procurement
of Goods, Works and Services  

PTCC302

Strategic
Supply Chain Management

 

 

 

 

Semester 7

18 Credits

Semester 8

16 Credits

GBEC401

Financial
Management

GBEC402

Integrative
Business Simulation

GBEC403

 Business Planning

GBEC404

Performance Management

GBEC405

Ethics
& Social Responsibility

GBEC406

Leadership

GBEC407

Strategic Management

 

 

HUMAN
RESOURCES CONCENTRATION/ ELECTIVES

 

 

 

HRCC401

Employment
and Labour Law

HRCC402

Human
Resource Development

 

 

HRCC404

Strategic
Human Resource Management

ACCOUNTING
AND FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT  CONCENTRATION/
ELECTIVES

 

 

 

FMCC

Financial
Strategy for Public Managers

FMCC402

Financial
Statement Analysis

 

 

FMCC404

International
Trade Finance

ENTREPRENEURSHIP  CONCENTRATION ELECTIVES

 

 

 

HRCC401

Employment
and Labour Law

ETCC402

Entrepreneurship
5: Managing Businesses for High-Growth

 

 

ETCC404

Entrepreneurship
6: Corporate Social Responsibility and Sustainable Business

LOGISTICS
AND SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT 
CONCENTRATION/ ELECTIVES

 

 

 

PTCC401

National
and International Negotiation

PTCC402

International Procurement

 

 

PTCC404

e-Procurement and e-Supply Chain

GBEC409    

Long Essay I / Project I

GBEC410     

Long Essay II / Project II

 

 

ELECTIVE

One Level 400 core subject from any other concentration areas

TOTAL PROGRAMME – 44 Courses

126 Credits

  • Course Description:

Provide short descriptions of the content of the courses in the programme to include:

  1. Objective
  2. Content
  3. Mode of delivery

Courses

SPRC101

LEARNING SKILLS I         

3 CREDITS


Objective
:

At the end of the course the students would have been able to improve their comprehension capacity for written and spoken language, reading and writing skills, and be able to expand their vocabulary and develop their critical thinking capabilities.

Content:

Students will be provided with three main areas of learning in this course namely; Social skills and Confidence, Time Management, and Writing Strategies. All this will combine to expose the student to study habits, writing and listening skills, and oral and group presentations and the ability to focus on research and Examinations

The content of this course includes, but not limited to, the following:

  • Life and learning skills required to become a successful graduate.
  • Working knowledge of the school’s environment.
  • Preparation skills to meet the academic and practical settings of the School.
  • Non-academic issues to assist students’ transition to the College.
  • Writing and listening skills
  • Oral and group presentation skills
  • Writing Course Expectations
  • rary Orientation; effective noteTaking Notes
  • Writing Effective
  • Sentences & Citation:
  • Official Writing
  • Preparing for tests and Examinations
  • Time management
  • Organizing and analyzing data
  • Managing stress during examinations
  • Making strong arguments
  • Essay planning
  • Using citations and references to summarize and paraphrase
  • Journal article referencing
  • Quotations and in-text citations.

Mode of Delivery:

The mode of delivery will include but not limited to lectures, class discussions, tutorials, story telling, Group Projects, individual Presentations, Group Presentations case studies, taking turns to read out loudly in class and class assignments.

Reading Materials:

1.    Amazon Digital Services LLC Learn Faster: Advanced Strategies On How to Learn Faster and Better (Accelerated Learning – Brain Training – Memory Improvement – Learning Techniques – Study Skills) Kindle Edition Jan, 2016

2.    Carter, Carol J. & Bishop, Joyce (2014). Keys to effective learning: Study skills and habits for success (6th Edition), Prentice Hall

3.    Frender, Gloria Marta Drayton, & Janet November (2013). Learning to learn (TRES) 3rd Edition: Incentive Publications by World Book

4.    Frender,  Gloria Bosarge, Charlotte & Marta Drayton (2016), Learning to learn: strengthening study skills and Brain Power, 3rd Edition, Incentive Publications; 2003)

5.    Graff, G., Birkenstein, C. (2019). They say, I say – The moves that matter in academic Writing, New York: W.W. Norton & Company.

6.    Rosenwasser, D., Stephen, J. (2011), Writing analytically, New York: Thomson Wadsworth

SPRC102

LEARNING SKILLS II    

3 CREDITS


Objective:

The course builds on the Learning Skills I course. It would focus on student communication and thinking skills for academic work and life. At the end of the course the student should:

  • Be able to sharpen their skills to easily recall both spoken and written materials (recollection and attentiveness skills), envisage concepts
  • Be self-composed in high stress situations such as in public speaking and examinations (relaxation techniques), and be able to perceive themselves as effective learners;
  • Communicate effectively in reading, comprehension, speaking and writing.

Content:                                                                              

The student develop “word attack” skills, sound-symbol relationships, word roots understanding, basic language patterns, verb endings, compound words, prefixes, noun endings, suffixes, homonyms, homophones, vocabulary development, expansion of vocabulary, new words (monosyllabic), reading comprehension skills, and word order, meaning in context, ordering main events, remembering facts and details, main idea, reading practice, successful small group discussions, level advancement checks, timed readings, comprehension questions, synonyms, recognize and pronounce words by applying word attack skills strategies; using basic principles of phonetics, “connect” the relationship between sound and symbols; sound out new words, recognize basic language patterns; recognize main ideas, continuous improvement in reading rate, and comprehension through advancing levels of selections.

Topics to be treated include: reading techniques – context clues, scanning and skimming, reading for comprehension and information details, drawing inferences and conclusions; summarizing and paraphrasing;  reading and interpreting non-prose forms of writing; organizing information; writing phrases,  clauses; elements, structure, and principles of construction of a sentence; parallelism; paragraphs and paragraphing; and long essay construction. 

The students will learn to differentiate between three types of questions – objective, factual, and Academic works such as paper, term paper, report, thesis and final thesis, annotation, abstract, review as well as their presentation belongs to the area of scientific works; therefore they have to meet general requirements of structure and content.

The course is about theoretical requirements of writing and presentation to equip students to effectively communicate in specific situations, which may include various academic, professional, or civic situations. This will enable students understand and respond appropriately to the critical elements that shape communication situations, such as audience, purpose, and genre.

 

Mode of Delivery:

The mode of delivery will include but not limited to lectures, class discussions, case studies, story telling, taking turns to read loudly during lectures, tutorials class debates and class assignments.

 

Reading Materials:

 

1. Amazon Digital Services LLC, (2019). Learn faster: Advanced strategies on how to learn faster and better (Accelerated learning – Brain training – memory improvement – Learning Techniques – Study skills) Kindle Edition, 

2. Carter, Carol J. & Bishop, Joyce (2014). Keys to effective learning: Study skills and habits for success (6th Edition), Prentice Hall

3. Frender, Gloria Marta Drayton, & Janet November (2013). Learning to learn (TRES) 3rd Edition: Incentive Publications by World Book

4.  Frender Gloria Bosarge, Charlotte & Marta Drayton  November (2003), Learning to learn: strengthening study skills and Brain Power, 2nd Edition, Incentive Publications; (2003)

5. Graff, G., Birkenstein, C. May (2016). They say, I say – The moves that matter in academic writing, New York: W.W. Norton & Company.

6. Rosenwasser, D., Stephen, J. (2011), Writing analytically, New York: Thomson Wadsworth.

SPRC103

FRENCH I

2 CREDITS


Objective:

This course introduces the students to basic skills in expressions in French-language. At end of the course the student is able to speak and understand simple French in daily situations. The student is also able to develop communication skills in speaking, listening, reading, and writing in modern standard French.

Content:

The course is in four parts. Part one is the introductory French. At this level, students will be introduced to some basic expressions using basic rules in the language. Students at this stage are encouraged to do more oral practice and much more reading aloud. This will enable them to improve upon their pronunciation and speaking. Some relevant topics to be treated at this level will be on verb conjugation using the three tenses: present simple, present perfect and future simple.

By the end of the course, students should be able to recognise basic French expressions and vocabulary.

Topics to be covered include: French phonetics, sentence construction, definite and indefinite articles, negative formation and verb conjugation.

 

Mode of Delivery:

Mode of delivery include in-class discussions, power point presentations, group discussions, use of computer applications and demonstrations, which show real-life pronunciations and concepts. Study resources that will be used include printed materials, Language Lab Videos and Tapes that support self or independent study.

By the end of the course, students should be capable of using their skills to express themselves in oral and in writing forms. 

Reading Materials:

  1. Valdman, A., Pons &  Scullen.  Chez  nous  (2014).  Branché  sur  le  monde  francophone. Prentice  Hall   Paper  Bound  with  Access  Card,
  1. Osei S. 2014.  An easy approach to French composition.  vol. 1 & 2  Trans afrique volume 1 & 2 Speeddad
  1. Tsikpo T. (2010). Spear Guide to basic studies in French. Logiprint.
  1. Herraps (April 2012) Compact French Dictionary (English French) Spectrum Books
  1. Valdman, A., Pons &  Scullen.  Chez  nous  (2014).  Branché  sur  le  monde  francophone. Prentice  Hall   Paper  Bound  with  Access  Card


SPRC104

FRENCH II

2 CREDITS


Objective:
The course builds on the first semester’s course of Level 100 to further develop the verbal and writing skills of students in French. 

Content:

Specific areas students will be exposed to include but not limited to:

  • Introduced to different forms of vocabularies in French language for everyday expressions.
  • Jargons in various occupational settings.
  • Reading Comprehension in French.
  • Les metiers-occupations
  • The use of subject and object pronouns in French
  • Comprehension ecrite and regular and irregular verbs.

Mode of Delivery:

Mode of delivery includes in-class discussions, power point presentations, group discussions, use of computer applications and demonstrations, role playing which show real-life pronunciations and concepts. Texts will be taken from reading text-books in French and students will be coached to read such texts. Students will be required to orally answer text book questions.

By the end of the course, students should be able to pronounce words, use the right vocabulary and express themselves well by way of communicating among themselves and other speakers of the language. 

Reading Materials:

  1. Valdman, A., Pons &  Scullen.  Chez  nous (2014).  Branché  sur  le  monde  francophone. Prentice  Hall   Paper  Bound  with  Access  Card,  
  2. Osei, S. (2014). An easy approach to French composition.  1 & 2  Trans afrique volume 1 & 2 Speeddad
  3. Tsikpo T. 2010. Spear guide to basic studies in French.
  4. Harraps (2007) Compact French Dictionary (English French) Spectrum Books
  5. Thomas, M. 2000. French introductory course. Hodder Education
  6. Kurbegov E. 2011. Practice makes perfect basic French. McGraw-Hill Educatio

SPRC105

INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY

3 CREDITS


Objective
:

At the end of this course students can relate to the basic concepts and techniques of modern behavioural patterns and settings and be able to describe or explain the role of social psychology as a behavioural science.

Content:

Students will understand how to conduct scientific study of human society relating to culture and social interactions. Students will be thought how to make assumptions about how people think and behave and use this understanding to in modelling consumer decision-making process, in modelling voting behaviour politics and in modelling rewards in personnel managemnet. Students would be thought how to use such models to promote social, economic and political change and also explore the sociology of Ghana.

Major topics:

  • The process of learning in relation to psychology and socialisation;
  • Diversity and inequality
  • Cognitive psychology (memory, language, intelligence reasoning and decision making);
  • Development Psychology (Physical and life plan, cognitive, and social)
  • Neuroscience and cognitive neuroscience);
  • Social institutions, social change, organisations, cooperation and sociology of Ghana
  • Personality and social psychology (Personality, social psychology, motivation and emotion)
  • The resolution of social problems (poverty and racism).

 

Mode of Delivery:

The content of this course will be delivered through a combination of in-class lectures, tutorials and class assignments simulation exercises and case studies.

Reading Materials:

  1. Macionis, John J. March (2017). Sociology (Global  Edition), Pearson
  1. Assimeng, J. M.(2006) Understanding society; an introduction to sociology for African students. Accra : Woeli Publishing Services,
  1. Assimeng, J. M 2nd Edition(2010). Religion and social change in West Africa: an introduction to the sociology of religion .Accra : Woeli Pub. Services,
  1. Vander Zanden, James Wilfrid.(1996). The social experience: an introduction to sociology. New York : McGraw-Hill
  1. Banaji, M. and Grenwwald, A. (2016) Hidden Biases of Good People. Bantam
  1. Benson, N. (2007). Psychology: A graphic guide to your mind and behaviour. Crow’s Nest, NSW: Allen & Unwin
  1. Breedlive, M. S. and Watson N. (January 2018). Biological Psychology: An introduction to Behavioural, cognitive and Clinical neuroscience 7th Ed. Sinaeur and Associates
  1. Freud, S. (2010). Civilization and its Disconnects Discontents W.W Norton & Company.


SPRC106

INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY AND CRITICAL THINKING

3 CREDITS


Objective:

At the end of this course students should be able to apply knowledge and skills acquired to construct arguments and draw sound conclusions. Students become analytical and critical in thinking relating to life issues business problem solving.

Content:

The course discusses how words, language and knowledge can be employed to make arguments, analyze assumptions and ascertain the validity of conclusions. The course imparts skills for logical (inductive and deductive) reasoning in a wide variety of business applications.

Major topics:

Specific topics include but not limited to:

  • Word and word understanding, framing of premises and conclusions, and methods of philosophy.
  • Surveys of the writings of a number of major historical figures in the fields. 
  • Introducing philosophers and problems from the individual, cooperate and national (Particularly developing countries) and ability to think critically about the issues
  • Distinction between logic, rhetoric and ranting,
  • Distinction between deductive and inductive arguments
  • Analysis of ambiguities and the nature of common fallacies in reasoning.
  • Symbolization and evaluation of deductive arguments using truth tables and the construction of proofs to assess validity.
  • Extensions of classical logic and fundamental issues pertaining to the nature of reasoning and logic in generally.

At end of the course, students should be able to think critically about issues and ideas, analyse situations objectively and suggest solutions to life and  business issues.

Mode of delivery:

The content of this course will be delivered through a combination of in-class lecturers, tutorials, cse studies, presentations, discussions and class assignments.

Reading Materials:

1. Bello, A.G.A. (2000). Introduction to Logic. Ibadan: University Press PLC

(Reference Unavailable)

2. Lauer, H.   and Amponsah, B. (2013). Critical Thinking and Practical Reasoning Course Reader: Accra: Faculty of Arts, University of Ghana.

(Reference Unavailable)

3. Christensen, Kit R. (1999). Philosophy and Choice: Selected Readings from around the World. Mountain View: Mayfield Publishing Company. (pp. 100-108).

4. Copi, I.M., & Cohen, Carl. (2008). Introduction to Logic. Upper Saddle River: Pearson Education Inc.

5. Gyekye, Kwame. (2004). The Unexamined Life: Philosophy and the African Experience. Accra: Sankofa Publishing Co. Ltd.

6. Miller, Miller E.D. L. (1999). Questions that Matter: An Introduction to Philosophy. New York: Mc Graw Hill.

7.      Critical Thinking by Moore, Brooke Noel, Parker, Richard 10th (tenth) Edition (2011)

8. New York: McGraw Hill.

9.      Questions That Matter: An Invitation to Philosophy, Shorter Version Aug 2005

10.  Revel for Ethics: Theory and Practice, Updated Edition — Access Card (11th Edition) May 2016

GBEC101

PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS (MICRO & MACRO)

3 CREDITS


Objective:

This course builds the knowledge of students with the basic micro and macro-economic concepts, principles and theories necessary for the economic analysis of problems so as to offer cost effective solutions.

Content:

The specific topics to be discussed from the micro economic aspect include but noy limited to:

  • Basic concepts, principles and theories of micro and macro economics.
  • Rational economic behaviour of the consumer and the nature of demand curves.
  • Equilibrium of the firm and the behaviour of the different types of markets in allocating scarce resources
  • Fundamental operations of markets (Scarcity and choice, economic systems Demand and supply, price, income and cross price elasticities, Consumer behaviour, theory of the firm, cost curves, profit maximization, market structure: perfect competition and monopoly and imperfect competition).

From the macroeconomic aspects the following topics will be treated:

  • Classical and Keynesian macroeconomics,
  • Components of aggregate demand, national income determination, national income measurement and uses
  • Sectoral contribution (agriculture, industry and services) to the Gross Domestic Product (GDP) of Ghana,
  • Fiscal and monetary policies, inflation, unemployment and external trade of Ghana.

Mode of Delivery:

The course will be delivered through in-class lectures/PowerPoint presentations, case studies, class and group discussions.

Reading Materials:

  1. Lipsey, R. & Chry, A (January 2018). Economics, 13th Edition, Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  1. Marshall, A (2016). Principles of economics, London: MacMillan & Co
  1. Rittenberg, L. & Tregarthen, T (2012). Principles of microeconomics, Carolina: Carolina University
  1. Samuelson, P. A. (4th Edition April 2006). Economics, Boston: McGraw-Hill
  1. Stiglitz, J. E. & Walsh, C. E (2006). Economics, 4th Edition – New York: W. W. Norton & Company
  1. Ahiawodzi, A. K. (2013). Macroeconomics, Accra: Sahabia Publication.
  1. Bade, R. & Parkin, M. 8th Edition (Jan 2017). Foundations of macroeconomics, Boston: Pearson Addison Wesley.
  1. Bawumia, M. (2010). Monetary policy and financial sector reforms in Africa, Ghana’s experience, Accra. Combert Impressions Ghana Ltd
  1. Mankiw, N. G (2014). Macroeconomics, Boston: South-Western College
  1. Killick, T. (2010). Development economics in action: A study of economic policies in Ghana,Oxford: Routhledge
  1. ISSER (2014).The state of Ghanaian economy, ISSER: University of Ghana, Legon                       
  1. Stockman (2012). Introduction to Macroeconomics, Boston: South-Western College

GBEC102

ECONOMY OF GHANA

3 CREDITS


Course Objective:
This course aims at making students acquire basic understanding of the Ghanaian economy.

Content:

This course analyses and discusses key aspects of the Economy of Ghana in relation to policy formulation implementation and the impacts realized 

Topics to be covered include but not limited to the following:

  • Introduction and Overview of the Economy of Ghana
  • The Financial Sector and Inflation    
  • Economic Planning                
  • Sustainable Development/Environment        
  • Structural Adjustment
  • Employment               
  • Poverty and Income Distribution
  • The Economic Sectors and their relative performance
  • SWOT Analysis of the Economy of Ghana

Reference Text:

Reference materials include but not limited to the following:

  1. ISSER (various issues). The State of the Ghanaian Economy Report. Legon: ISSER.
  2. Killick, Tony (2010). Development Economics in Action: A study of Economic Policies in Ghana, 2nd edition. London and New York: Routledge.
  3. Aryeetey, E., Harrigan, J. & Nissanke, M. (2000). Economic Reforms in Ghana: The Miracle and the Mirage. Oxford: James Currey.
  4. Other useful resources include the following websites:
  5. The Bank of Ghana www.bog.gov.gh
  6. Ghana Statistical Service www.statsghana.gov.gh
  7. World Bank, Ghana Office www.worldbank.org/en/country/ghana
  8. International Monetary Fund, Ghana Office www.imf.org/external/country/gha/
  9. Relevant Government of Ghana Ministries/Departments/Agencies via www.ghana.gov.gh

 GBEC103

BUSINESS MATHEMATICS

3 CREDITS


Objective:

At the end of the programme students will develop their mathematical skills requiredy for analyzing numerical information to understand the veracity of business problems and to suggest objective solutions.

Content:

In this course the quantitative analytical knowledge, skills and attitudes will be imparted to the students so that these could be applied in business problem solving and decision making.

Topics to be treated include but not limited to the following:

  • Applications of ratio and proportion,
  • Computing taxes,
  • Commercial discounts
  • Simple and compound interest,
  • Annuities
  • Debt reduction
  • Sinking funds,
  • Capitalization and wasting of assets
  • Stocks and bonds,
  • Numeric and algebraic basicsAlgebraic forms and functions
  • Quadratic and other functions; and graphs.

Students are expected to be able to apply basic quantitative skills to making business decision.

Mode of Delivery:

Learning will be facilitated through class discussions, power point presentations, group discussions, use of computer applications, demonstrations and simulations, which show real-life application of mathematical concepts related to business situations, assignments and problem solving.

Reading Materials:

  1. Andy A. Francis (2004). Business mathematics and statistics Thomson Learning London.
  2. Deitz James E. & Southam James L (2016). Contemporary Business Mathematics for Colleges, 17th Edition Cengage Brain San Francisco.ISBN-10: 1305506685  |  ISBN-13: 9781305506688
  3. Eccles P. (1998) An Introduction to Mathematical Reasoning Cambridge University Press
  4. Williams, Walter E. (1987) Fundamentals of business mathematics C. Brown Dubuque, Iowa
  5. Weber, Jean E. (1982). Mathematical analysis; business and economic applications. 3rd Harper and Row. New York
  6. Wheeler, Ruric E (1986) Modern mathematics with applications to business and the social sciences Brooks Cole Publications Co. Monterey, California

GBEC104

COMPUTER SKILLS

3 CREDITS


Objective:

This course equips students with the knowledge and skills to use computers and apply information technology in different settings of work and studies.  The focus of the course is to prepare students to use computer and information technology effectively in undertaking their studies.  The course is designed to offers students “hands on” experience. The course further provides students with the knowledge of using software applications in office environments or in work settings.

Content:

The course is designed into two parts all aimed at introducing students to the basic components of a computer system and their application. The first part deals with the overview of the information Technology field. Topics covered include but not limited to:

  • Basic Introduction to Computers (History and architecture),
  • Types and applications of computer software
  • Introduction to operating systems (DOS, Windows [File Organization and System] and others).

The part two prepares students with hands-on experiential learning to be able to use office productivity tools, which include, but not limited to:

  • Word processing, use of spreadsheet and presentation tools.
  • Microsoft Office or any other open source productivity tools (Open Office).

At the end of the course, students are expected to acquire a good knowledge about computing which prepares them for taking higher Computer Science/IT courses whiles applying the skills for academic course work.

Mode of Delivery:

The Course will be delivered through lectures/power point presentations, individual and group assignments and practical computer lab sessions.

Reading Materials:

1.    Reed, D. (2010). Balanced Introduction to computer science, A: International Version, Pearson Higher Education.

2.    Goldschlager, L. (1988). Computer science: A Modern introduction, Prentice Hall; 2 edition

3.    Thareja R. 2nd Edition (October 2019). Fundamentals of computers, Oxford Press, ISBN 9780199452729

4.    Sedgewick, R. and Wayne, K. (June 2016). An introduction to computer science. Princeton.

5.    Weverka, P.2016. Microsoft Office (2016),  All-in-one for dummies. John Willey and Sons. ISBN 13978-1119083122


SPRC201

FRENCH III

2 CREDITS


Objective:

This course builds on French II and the objective is to develop the communication skills of the student to use expressions relating to various situations in life. The course is to enable students improve on their sentence construction capabilities.

Content:                     

Topics include but not limited to:

  • Social, economic, political and geographical situations discussed in French. Grammar and constructional works will be more dealt with.
  • Tenses in French language.
  • Mon Ecole’’- Identifying subjects taught at Schools and time Frames or periods
  • Mon village’’- identifying the right locations and important landmarks.
  • Art of reading in French

Mode of Delivery:

Mode of delivery include lectures, class discussions, assignments and power point presentations, group discussions, use of computer applications and audio and video demonstrations that illustrate real-life pronunciations and concepts. Learners will be coached to read more from relevant text-books newspapers, magazines and journals in French.

Reading Materials:

1.    Valdman, A., Pons & Scullen.  Chez  nous  (2019).  Branché  sur  le  monde  francophone. Prentice  Hall   Paper  Bound  with  Access  Card,  

2.    Osei S. 2014.  An easy approach to French composition, vol. 1 & 2  Trans afrique volume 1 & 2 Speeddad

3.    Tsikpo T. 2010. Spear Guide to basic studies in French. Logiprint.

4.    Harraps(2007). Compact French dictionary (English French). Spectrum Books

5.    Thomas, M. 2000.  French introductory course. Hodder Education

6.    Kurbegov E. February 2017. Practice makes perfect basic French. McGraw-Hill Education

SPRC202

FRENCH IV

2 CREDITS


Objective:

This course builds on French III to further enhance the French communication skills of students. It builds the grammar, pronunciation, oral comprehension, speaking reading, and writing competencies of the student.

Content:

Student builds on earlier courses in French to be able to undertake more advanced studies in French. Essays and other forms of compositions are thought to the student. Students will be engaged rigorously to make presentations on diverse issues in French.

Topics to be covered include but not limited to:

Articles, direct and indirect object pronouns, imperfect construction, and conditional tenses, past simple tenses, relative pronouns, report writing and Reading comprehension.

Mode of Delivery:

Facilitation methods include lectures, class discussions, assignments and power point presentations, group discussions, use of computer applications and illustrations of practical pronunciations and concepts.

Reading Materials:

  1. Valdman, A., Pons & Scullen.  Chez nous (2014). Branché sur le monde francophone. Prentice-Hall   Paper  Bound  with  Access  Card,  
  2. Osei S. 2014. An easy approach to French composition. 1 & 2 Trans afrique volume 1 & 2 Speeddad
  3. Tsikpo T. (2010). Spear Guide to basic studies in French.
  4. Harraps (2007) Compact French dictionary (English French) 2007. Spectrum Books
  5. Thomas, M. (2000). French introductory Course. Hodder Education
  6. Kurbegov E. (February 2017). Practice makes perfect basic French. McGraw-Hill Education 2nd Edition

SPRC203

ORGANISATIONAL BEHAVIOUR

3 CREDITS


Objective:

The main purpose of this course is to enable students grasp the concepts of causes and effects of human behaviour and actions at the workplace and to understand how such knowledge can be used subsequently to moderate behaviour. This course sets the foundation pillars of management.

Content:

The course draws from social science disciplines of Psychology, Politics, Sociology and Economics and adopts interdisciplinary approach to develop of theories that facilitate empirical research relating to human behaviour in organisations.

The specific topics discussed in this course include but not limited to the following:

  • The Nature of organisational Behaviour: Approaches to Organisation and Management;
  • The Nature and Context of Organisations;
  • Individual Differences and Diversity;
  • The Nature of Learning;
  • Perception and Communication;
  • Work Motivation,
  • Morale and Job Satisfaction;
  • The Nature of Work Groups and Teams;
  • Working in Groups and Teams;
  • The Nature of Leadership,
  • Structures of Organisations;
  • Organisational Control and Power; membership conflict and cooperation;
  • organisational culture, change and development;
  • Impact of technology on organisations;
  • Personnel psychology;
  • Bargaining behaviour and group dynamics;
  • Society, the worker and work environment

Mode of Delivery:

The content of this course will be delivered through a combination of case studies, in-class lecturers, assignments, power-point presentations and discussions, and research projects.

Reading Materials:

  1. Du Brin, A. J. (2005). Fundamentals of organizational behaviour (3rded.). South-Western Cengage Learning
  2. Knights, D. & Willmott, H. (2007). Organisational Bebaviour & Management. Cengage Learning EMEA
  3. Mullins, L. J. (2007). Management and organizational Behaviour (8th ed.). Milan: RotolitoLombarda.
  4. Mullins, L. J. (2013). Management & organisational behaviour 10th Edition, Pearson Education Limited, Edinburgh Gate Harlow, UK
  5. Nelson, D. L., & Quick, J. C. (2006). Organizational behaviour: Foundations, realities & challenges (5th ed.). China: South- Western Corporation.
  6. Robbins, S. P., Judge, T. A., & Sanghi, S. (2009). Organizational behaviour (13th ed.). New Delhi: Pearson Prentice Hall.

GBEC201

QUANTITATIVE METHODS FOR BUSINESS

3 CREDITS


Objective
:

To develop the quantitative analytical skills of the student for business decision-making.

Content: 

This course is designed to enable students to apply statistics and mathematics models to solve business and operations problems. The course integrates applied business research and descriptive statistics.

Topics that will be discussed include but not limited to:

  • Time series analysis
  • Methods of statistical inference including confidence intervals
  • Hypothesis testing
  • Statistical regression and correlation.

Mode of Delivery:

Mode of delivery include  lectures, plenary class discussions, power point presentations, group discussions, use of computer programmes and other applications and illustrations to depict real-life application of quantitative techniques in business and operational situations.

Reading Materials:

1.    Anderson, David R. (David Ray), (February 2015). Quantitative methods for business. Mason, Ohio : Thomson/South-Western

2.    Bharat Kolluri Michael J. Panik Rao N. Singamsetti (July 2016). Introduction to quantitative methods in business with applications using Microsoft Excel Wiley SBN 978-1-119-22097-8

3.    Dennis J. Sweeney,& Thomas A Williams (January 2018). Quantitative methods for business 15th Ed Cengage Learning India

4.    Barry Render, Ralph M. Stair, Michael E. Hanna (2014). Quantitative analysis for management and student CD-ROM, Eighth Edition Publisher: Prentice Hall.

5.    Brandimarte, Paolo (2013). Quantitative methods : an introduction for business management  Hoboken, N.J. : Wiley,

6.    Buglear, John. (2015). Quantitative methods for business : the A to Z of QM.Oxford : Butterworth-Heinemann,

7.    Curwin, Jon. (2008). Quantitative methods for business decisions. London : Thomson Learning. 

8.    Louise Swift, Sally Piff (2014). Quantitative methods for business, management and finance 4th Ed. Palgrave Macmillan.

GBEC202

HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

3 CREDITS


Objective
:

At the end of the course, students should be able to understand the complex decisions that all managers make in performing the HR function in a dynamic and exciting work environment and how such decision support or inhibit labour productivity.

Students will be exposed to concepts, principles, processes, and contemporary challenges in human resource management.

Content:

This course exposes students to concepts and application areas of Human Resources Management (HR). It explores how the interdependence of the major topics in HR are created and implemented. 

Topics that will be discussed include:

  • HR concepts, principles, and processes
  • Introduction to HRM
  • Organizational Structure and HRM
  • Job Analysis and Design
  • Recruitment Selection
  • Managing Careers
  • Performance Appraisal
  • Employment Relationships and the Law
  • Performance Management
  • Compensation and Benefits
  • Managing Employees for Competitive Advantage
  • Organizational Demands and Environmental Influences;
  • Legal Compliance
  • Employee Benefits
  • Health, and Wellness
  • Labor Unions and Industrial Relations

Mode of Delivery:

The course will be delivered through in-class lectures, discussions, case studies and group and individual assignments.

Reading Materials:

1.    Banfield Paul, & Kay Rebecca (April 2018) Introduction to human resources management   Oxford University Press.

2.    Phillips, J, & Gully, S. (January 2018). Human Resource Management. Mason, OH: South-Western

3.    Martin, Graeme, (March 2016) Managing people and organisations in changing context. Oxford: Elsevier

4.    Steen, S., Noe, R., Hollenbeck, J., Gerhart, B., & Wright, P. (2013). Human Resource Management (3rd Canadian Ed.). Toronto: McGraw Hil

5.    Stredwick, John. (July 2013) An introduction to human resource management. London: Elsevier Butterworth-Heinemann

6.    Laroche, Lionel. (2007) Recruiting, retaining, and promoting culturally different employees, Amsterdam; Boston: Elsevier Butterworth-Heinemann,

GBEC203

PRINCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING I

3 CREDITS


Objective:

At the end of this course, students are expected to have a solid base in basic accounting concepts and principles and to be enriched in all the fundamental principles of financial accounting in relation to simple business entities.

Content:

Topics to be discussed include but not limited to:

  • Basic accounting concepts
  • Principles of double-entry accounting technique
  • Preparation of basic financial statements for single entities.

Mode of Delivery:

The course will be facilitated in as practical manner as possible. A combination of lecturers, tutorials, case studies, class assignments and presentations will constitute some of the modes of delivery of the course.

Reading Materials:

1.    Collins, S. M. H (2007). Dictionary of accounting, London: A &C Black

2.    Weygandt and Kieso (January 2018). Accounting Principles 10th edition

3.    Wood and Sangster and Sangster (June 2018). Frank Wood’s business accounting   

   2, Volume 2

4.    Wood, Frank et. al. (January 2018). Frank Wood’s business accounting, Vol1 &2,

   Volume one, London: Pearson

5.    Weetman, P (March 2019). Financial and management accounting: an introduction,

   London: Pearson.

                                                                        

GBEC204

PRINCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING II

3 CREDITS


Objective:

At end of the course, the students will have a solid foundation in basic accounting concepts and principles and would appreciate the role of the accounting process and how it is used to monitor and report the financial performance of a firm or organization. It builds on Principles of Accounting I

Content:

The topics are a continuation of the previous accounting course in a slightly advanced manner and include but not limited to:

  • Principles and concepts relating to financial accounting
  • Double-entry accounting technique
  • Preparation of financial statements for single entities. This stage of the course is very important and therefore should be made as practical as possible.

Mode of Delivery:

The course will be facilitated in as practical manner as possible. A combination of lecturers, tutorials, case studies, class assignments and presentations will constitute some of the modes of delivery of the course.

Reading Materials:

1.    Collins, S. M. H (2007). Dictionary of accounting, London: A &C Black

2.    Weygandt and Kieso (January 2018). Accounting Principles 10th edition

3.    Wood and Sangster and Sangster (June 2018). Frank Wood’s business accounting 2, Volume 2

4.    Wood, Frank et. al. (January 2018). Frank Wood’s business accounting, Vol1 &2, Volume one, London: Pearson

5.    Weetman, P (March 2019). Financial and management accounting: an introduction, London: Pearson.


GBEC205

PRINCIPLES OF MANAGEMENT

3 CREDITS


Objective:

To aim is to develop the managerial knowledge and skills of the students and prepare them for taking and executing such responsibilities in the life’s career. The course creates awareness among the students that nothing meaningful can be achieved by an organization without effective and efficient management.  Students will learn concepts and practices associated with managing people and organisational dynamics in relation to private business.

Content:

Topic to be covered include but not limited to:

  • The concept of management, functions and principles.
  • Theories of management
  • Private Business organisations, their establishment and how they grow
  • Management of Private business organisations
  • Elements of human Behaviour in businesses organisations
  • Managing Diversity

Mode of Delivery:

The mode of delivery includes, but is not limited to, in-class lectures, case studies, practical assignments, simulations, and seminar presentations.

Reading Materials:

  1. Cole, G. (2004). Management Theory and Practice. 6th London Cengage Learning
  2. Robbins, S. & Coulter, M. (2016). Management, Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson.
  3. Nahavandi, A., Denhardt, R., Denhardt, J., & Aristigueta, M. (2015). Organizational behaviour. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.
  4. Clegg Steward R.; Hardy Cynthia, and Nord Walter R. (1999) Managing Organisations, Current Issues, SAGE Publications Ltd.
  5. Kirton, Gill. (2010) The dynamics of managing diversity: a critical approach, Burlington: Elsevier.
  6. Martin, Graeme, (March 2016). Managing people and organisations in changing context. Oxford Elsevier.
  7. Robbins S.P. & Judge, T.A. (2010): Organizational Behaviour: International version, 14th: Pearson International.
  8. Aristigueta, M. (2015). Organisational behaviour. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.

GBEC206

PRINCIPLES OF PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION   

3 CREDITS


Objective:
The main purpose of this course is to introduce students to the theories, concepts and practices of public administration settings and how these affect effectiveness and efficiency of public service delivery.

Content

The topics to be treated include but not limited to the following:

  • Overview of the field of public administration its development and importance in modern government operations.
  • Operation of government at all levels in Ghana.
  • Role of the bureaucracy in a young democracy like Ghana
  • Application of management and organizational theory to the public setting
  • Constraints of public administration in relation to organizational development, human resources practices, ethics and values, professionalism, governmental budgeting and finance.
  • Theories of public organizations,
  • Bureaucratic discretion and accountability
  • Policy formulation and implementation
  • The changing nature of public administration.

At the end of the course students can demonstrate a good understanding of public administration at the turn of the 21st century in terms of the nature, scope, structures, functions, and challenges.

Mode of delivery:

Learning will be facilitated through lectures, individual and group assignment presentations, group discussions and case studies from the public sector organizations in Ghana other countries. Storey telling and guest lectures would also be employed to illustrate the work life of a public administrators in various scenarios.

Reading Materials:

  1. Greene, Jeffrey D. (2004). Public Administration in the New Century: A Concise Introduction.
  2. Sharp, Brett S., et al. (2016). Managing in the Public Sector: A Casebook in Ethics and Leadership. Pearson.
  3. Ott, Steven J & Russell, E.W (2001) Introduction to Public Administration: A Book of Readings.  Pearson 

GBEC208

BUSINESS LAW       

3 CREDITS


Objective
:

The main objective is to introduce students to the legal environment of business and the legal issues managers have to content with on daily basis as well as the legal recourses available for addressing such issues.

Content:

The topics to be treated include but not limited to the following:

  • Analytical framework to identify legal and ethical issues.
  • The role of legal counsel in businesses.
  • Management of litigation and the settlement of disputes (forms of alternative dispute resolution).
  • The regulatory environment of business.
  • Administrative law.
  • Protection of intellectual property.
  • Purpose of law in society
  • Structure of the judicial system
  • Contracts and business organisations
  • Tort and criminal law and procedure.

Mode of Delivery:

Learning will be facilitated through lectures, individual and group assignment presentations, group discussions and case studies from the Judicial Sector in Ghana other countries. Storytelling, demonstration videos and guest lectures would also be employed to illustrate the work life of managers in various legal scenarios.

Reading Materials:

1.    Ghartey, Joe. (January 2019). Doing business and investing in Ghana: legal and institutional framework. Janet Publications, Accra, Ghana

2.    Adjei-Mensah, Kwadwo (2004-2006). Principles of business law, Accra : His Grace Publications,

3.    Abbott, Keith.(2002). Business law. London : Continuum,

4.    Nayler, Peter.(October 2015). Business law in the global marketplace the effects of international business, Oxford, Eng. ; Burlington, MA : Elsevier Butterworth-Heinemann, 

5.    Kadar, Abby (1996). Business law. Oxford Made Simple Books

6.    Harrison, Tom (1994). Business law, Sunderland Business Education Publishers

7.    Anderson, Ronald A.(2013). Business law. Cincinnati: South-Western Pub. Co.

8.    Lawson, Robert G., (1997). Business law for business and marketing students. Oxford, England : Butterworth-Heinemann,


SPRC301

RESEARCH METHODS

3 CREDITS


Objective:

This course intends to build the research methods knowledge and skills of the students so they can apply it to undertake business, economics and management research in general and hence be able to carry out a research dissertation. 

Content:

The course deals with the major types of research and discusses the methods and processes for adopting each type of research. The use of research for decision-making is emphasised in this course.

Topics include:

Background to Research, Developing research proposals, Research paradigms, Contributions of research to theory and practice, Research Ethics, Literature Review, Qualitative Methods, Quantitative Methods, Questionnaires Research Proposal and Presentation and defence of dissertation.

Upon completion of the course, students will acquire the basic research tools to enable them undertake business research effectively and efficiently.

 

Mode of Delivery:

Mode of delivery include lectures, class discussions, power point presentations and group assignments and discussions. Problem solving by the use of hands-on practical approach employing statistical packages computer programmes will be taught.

Reading Materials:

1.    Sue Greener & Joe Martelli (January 2014). An introduction to business research methods. 2nd E Edition Bookboon Premium ISBN: 978-87-403-0820-4

2.    Zikmund, William G. (2012). Business research methods, 7th Edition. Cengage Learning; 9th  edition 

3.    Sreejesh, S. Mohapatra, Anusree M.R. (2014). Business research methods. Springer International Publishing.978-3-319-00538-6

4.    Greener Sue (2008). Business research methods. Ventus Publishing ApS.

5.    Saunder Mark (2015). Research methods for business students. Pearson Custom Publishing; 7th Edition.

6.    Quinlan, Christina (2011). Business research methods. Andover: Cengage Learning

7.    Eriksson, Pèaivi. (2008). Qualitative methods in business research Los Angeles ; London : SAGE,              

8.    Saunders, Mark. (August 2015). Research methods for business students. Harlow: Financial Times Prentice Hall,


SPRC302

TOTAL QUALITY MANAGEMENT

3 CREDITS


Objective:

This course is aimed at making the student understand the concept of Total Quality Management (TQM) and to use such understanding to help organizations introduce such quality management

systems in their operations.

Content:

This course presents TQM as a way of life requiring cultural shift as a necessary step towards its introduction in every organization

Topics to be treated include but not limited to the following:

  • Quality Definitions and Concepts
  • History of Quality Management
  • Quality tools/Models and techniques
  • Importance of Total Quality Management in an Organization
  • Barriers to achieving Total Quality Management
  • Cost of Quality
  • Product quality and customer satisfaction

At the end of the course, students should be capable of evaluating the quality systems of organizations and suggesting modifications for optimum quality performance.

Mode of Delivery:

This course will be delivered through class discussions, lectures, case exercises and Power Point presentations, group discussions and group project assignments.

Reading Materials:

1.    Besterfield, D. H. (Jan 2010). Total quality management, (3rd ed.). Prentice Hall.

2.    Goetsch, D. L. & Davis, S. (May 2015). Quality management for organizational excellence: introduction to quality management, (8th ed.). Pearson Inc.

3.    Summers, D. C. S. (2005). Quality management: Creating and sustaining organizational effectiveness, New York: Pearson Prentice Hall

4.    Besterfield, D. H. (2010). Total quality management, (4th ed.). New York: Prentice Hall.

5.    Evans, J. and Lindsay (2005). The management and control of quality, Thompson – Southwestern.

6.    Gryna, F. M. (2001). Quality planning & analysis, (4thed.). Boston: McGraw-Hill


GBEC301

MANAGERIAL ECONOMICS

3 CREDITS


Objective:

The main objective is to equip students with the knowledge and analytical skills for making economic decisions concerning business enterprises. The students will be made to understand that managerial success is enhanced by such skills.

Content:

The present students with economic theory and analytical tools for economic decision making regarding the firm under conditions of risk and uncertainty. It enables the student to analyse the efficiency of decisions.

Topics include but not limited to:

  • Demand, cost and pricing decisions,
  • Decision-making criteria and procedures,
  • Optimisation problems, and linear programming.

Mode of Delivery:

This course will be delivered through class discussions, lectures, case exercises and Power Point presentations, group discussions and group project assignments

Reading Materials:

1.    Baye M. (Dec 2016). Managerial economics and business strategy (9th ed.). Boston: Irwin McGraw-Hill.

2.    Hirschey, M. (Jan 2005). Managerial economics (11th ed.)  New Jersey: Thomson/South-Western College Publishing.

3.    Keat, P. & Young, P. (2003). Manag Hirschey, M. (Jan 2013). Managerial economics (11th ed.)  New Jersey: Thomson/South-Western College Publishing, Managerial economics: Economic tools for today’s decision makers, Boston: Prentice Hall.

4.    McGuigan, J.R. Moyer, R.C and debHarris, F.H (September 2016). Managerial economics: Applications, strategy, and tactics, (10th  Edition), New

5.    Salvatore, D. (2011). Managerial economics in a global economy (7th ed.). New York: Fordham University.

6.    Samuelson, W. F, & Marks, S. G. (2013). Managerial economics (7th ed.), New York: John Wiley and Sons, Inc.


GBEC302

ENTREPRENEURSHIP

3 CREDITS


Objective
:

To equip students with entrepreneurship knowledge, skills, concepts and principles so as to develop their innovative skills for contributing to improving business performance and for setting up their own businesses.

Content:

The topics to be treated in this course include but not limited to:

  • Generating new business ideas
  • Attract investors
  • Marketing of good and services
  • Managing expenses.
  • Steps in setting up a business
  • Developing business plans.
  • Basic economic concepts related to small businesses, such as competition and production.
  • Characteristics of successful entrepreneurs.
  • Communication skills in speaking, writing, networking, negotiating, and listening.
  • Sales methods, financing and credit, accounting, pricing, and government regulations.

Upon completion of the course students should develop marketable business plans to attract funding.

Mode of Delivery:

This course will be delivered through lectures, case studies, tutorials, class assignments and inspirational stories of entrepreneurs who have converted their ideas into profitable businesses

Reading Materials:

  1. Knowles, Ronald A. (2003). Small business, an entrepreneur’s plan, Fourth Canadian Edition, Thompson/Nelson,
  2. Hisrich, Robert D., Michael Peters and Dean Shepherded (2011). Entrepreneurship, Tata McGraw Hill, ND
  3. Barringer, Brace R., and R., Duane Ireland (2012). Entrepreneurship, Pearson Prentice Hall, New Jersey (USA).
  4. Lall, Madhurima, and Shikha Sahai (2010): Entrepreneurship, Excel Book, New Delhi.
  5. Charantimath, Poornima, (2011): Entrepreneurship development and small business enterprises, Pearson Education, New Delhi.

GBEC303

 MARKETING MANAGEMENT

3 CREDITS


Objective:

The course aims at preparing the students to be able to grasp the Marketing Concept” and to apply this understanding together with the tools, techniques, templates presented in the theories to prepare and implement marketing plans and programmes for business organizations. The skill of developing integrated marketing communication programmes will be emphasized.

Content:

The course presents an overview of the marketing management process.

Topics to be treated include but not limited to:

  • The role of marketing in organizations
  • The nature of environmental of organizations
  • Marketing mix for products and services marketing
  • Analysing marketing opportunities
  • Market segmentation, targeting, and positioning (STP)
  • Dealing with competition
  • Developing marketing strategies
  • Branding
  • Managing and delivering marketing programmes
  • Customer value, satisfaction and retention.

Mode of Delivery:

The course will be delivered through in-class lectures, discussions, PowerPoint presentation and group projects.

Reading Materials:

1.    Kotler, P & Armstrong, G.(2006).   Principles of marketing, 13th Edition, Prentice Hall

2.    Kotler, P. & Keller K. L., (February 2011). Marketing management, (14thed.) New Delhi: Prentice Hall of India Private Ltd

3.    Kotler, P (February 2011). Marketing management: The millennium edition, Prentice-Hall Inc

4.    Lindstorm, M. (2012). Marketing management (5th ed.) New Delhi: McGraw- Hill Education Private Limited.


GBEC304

MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING

3 CREDITS


Objective:

To expose students to cost accounting techniques to enable them carry out cost planning, decision-making, performance evaluation, and control.

Content:

Topics that will be covered include but not limited to:

  • Cost accounting techniques needed for effective business accounting decision making.
  • Scarce resources, pricing and make-or-buy decisions.
  • Cost accounting for reporting
  • Cost and cost behaviour
  • Allocation of cost/overheads to products and cost centres
  • Accounting for inventories.

When students completes this course they should be able to employ cost accounting techniques for key business decision making.

Mode of Delivery:

Course will be facilitated through lectures, case studies, power point presentation, group assignments and discussions and preparation of financial plans and budgets.

Reading Materials:

1.    Brewer P., Garrison R., Noreen E., Kalagnanam S. & Vaidyanathan G. (2018). Introduction to managerial accounting: 2nd Canadian ed.  Ryerson:McGraw-   Hill

2.    Hilton S., Ronald, W., & Favere-Marchesi, M. (November 2019). Managerial accounting,(12th ed.). New York: McGraw-Hill/Irwin

3.    Ravi, M. K. (2013). Advanced management accounting. (3rd ed.) New Delhi: India and Oscar Publications, DEL.

4.    Ronald, W. H., Michael, M. & Frank S., Cost Management: Strategies for Business Decisions McGraw-Hill Irwin (September 2007)


GBEC305

OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT

3 CREDITS


Objective
:

This course aims at making the students become familiar with the concept of operations management predominantly as the management function that converts inputs to outputs of goods and services and as a result its effectiveness and efficiency affect profitability of firms a great deal.

Content:

Operations is about conversion of inputs to outputs of goods and services. The course provides students with basic understanding of concepts, techniques and tools to design, analyse, and improve core operational capabilities.

Topics covered include but not limited to:

  • Production planning
  • Production control
  • Risk pooling
  • Quality management
  • Process design.
  • Inventory control
  • Process design and analysis

At end of the course student is expected to apply concepts and techniques of operations management to assess and suggest improvements to the operational performance of business organisations.

Mode of Delivery:

The use of case studies, lectures/guest lectures, and simulation games coupled with in-class discussions, power point presentations, group discussions, use of computer packages

Reading Materials:

1.    David Collier and James Evans. Operations Management, 3rd Edition. Upper Saddle River, NJ: South-Western Cengage Learning. 2nd Edition (2007)

2.    Williams. J. (2013). Operations management: theory and practice. New York, N.Y.  McGraw-Hill/Irwin

3.    Amsterdam; Boston (2008). Quality and operations management.  Pergamon Open Learning,

4.    Stevenson, William J.(Febraury 20017).Operations management. Boston.McMcGraw-Hill

5.    Rowbotham, Frank.(February 2012). Operations management in context, Oxford, U.K. : Elsevier Butterworth-Heinemann,

6.    Stevenson, William J.(February 2015). Production/operations management. Boston : Irwin/McGraw-Hill

7.    Heizer, Jay H. (January 2016). Production and operations management: strategies and tactics. Boston: Allyn and Bacon

8.    Vonderembse, Mark A.(1998). Operations management: concepts, methods, and strategies St. Paul: West


GBEC306

MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS

3 CREDITS


Objective:

The main objective of this course is to develop the information management knowledge, skills and attitudes of the students so they can understand and appreciate that the effective collation, processing, storage and retrieval of management information for managerial decision making is key to managerial success. 

Content:

This course teaches students to have a wider appreciation of management information needs, its source within and outside the organization, the classification and issues relating to access etc.The relevance of management information for decision making is also emphasized.

The course will provide analysis in data and knowledge as a corporate resource, data processing, system theory, system environment, nature of organisations and organizational communication, database and system design as well as decision making.

Major topics:

  • Nature of Managerial Decisions
  • Management Information and Strategic Thinking
  • System Concepts and Information Systems
  • Competitive Strategies and the use of Information Technologies
  • Customer Relationship Management
  • Decision Support Systems and Computer Software
  • Enterprise and Global Management of Information Technology
  • Internal Assessment
  • Information Systems and Society
  • IT Infrastructure and Emerging Technologies
  • Organizations and Information Systems

At end of the course students can apply Computer Software such as Microsoft Excel to analyse information and make decision analysis.

Mode of delivery:

The content of this course will be delivered through a combination of lecturers, case studies, tutorials, class assignments and plenary discussions.

Reading Materials:

1.    James A. O’Brien (2008) Introduction to Information Systems, Essential for the E-Business enterprise – Eleventh Edition

2.    Muneesh Kumar (2007) Business Information Systems, Vikas Publishing House PVT Ltd, New Delhi, India

3.    Laudon. K. & Laudon, J. (March 2019), Management Information Systems: Managing the Digital Firm. 19th edition Boston, Pearson

4.    Laudon. K. & Laudon, J. (March 2019), Management Information Systems: Managing the Digital Firm. 16th edition Boston, Pearson

5.    Laudon and Laudon (2008), Essentials of Management Information Systems, International edition 8th edition. Pearson

6.    French C. S. (1993) Data Processing and Information Technology. DP. Publications


GBEC307 

COMPANY LAW

3 CREDITS


Objective
:

This course prepares the students to knowledge in and appreciate of the concept of Company Law and how this defines the legal processes involved in the setting up, ownership and management of a company.

Content:

The course emphasize the application of company law the Ghanaian and international jurisdictions. Students are made to understand and apply Common Law Rules and the Statutes regulating companies.

Topics that will be discussed include but not limited to:

  • Types of Companies
  • Incorporation of Companies
  • General Principles of Company Law
  • Capital, Share Capital & Debt Capital
  • Classes of Shares & Class Rights,
  • DirectorsAppointment & Termination, Powers, Duties and Liabilities
  • Board Meetings & Resolutions, Calling a Meeting (Notice, Service, Agenda, Quorum), Procedure at Meeting (Chairperson, Motions, Resolutions, Minutes, Approval of Minutes, Adjournments)
  • Corporate Governance, Company Secretary Statutory Duties and Notifications, Accounts, Audit, & Annual Returns
  • Registrar of CompaniesRoles and Responsibilities,
  • Dissolution & Winding-Up of Companies.

Upon completion of this course the student should be capable of providing sound legal advice the managers of a business bordering the company’s operations and decisions that have legal ramifications.

Mode of Delivery:

This course will be facilitated by lectures, review of cases, quizzes, debates, assignments, research mini-projects and Power-Point presentations

Reference Materials:

1.    Bondzi-Simpson, P.E (2009). Company law in Ghana. Accra: Avant Associates Ltd.

2.    Bagrial, A (2005). Company law (11th ed.). New Delhi: Vikas Publishing House PVT Ltd.

3.    Barber, S. (2003) . Company law (4th ed.). London: Old Baily Press.

4.    Dine Janet, & Koutsias, Marios (March 2009) Company Law.. Palgrave Macmillan, UK

5.    Gower, L .C. B., & Comn, J.B (2016). Principles of modern company law (10th ed.). London: Stevens & Sons

6.    Companies Code 1963 (Act 179)

7.    Incorporated Private Partnership Act, 1962, Act 152

8.    Government of Ghana (1961) Report of the Commission of Enquiry into the Working and Administration of Company Law in Ghana (1961) (Gowers Report)

HRCC301           

TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT

3 CREDITS


Objective
:

This course aims at making students understand the concept of training and development and to acquire the skills for conducting competency-based training needs analysis so that training and development investments can ensure that competency gaps are filled.

Content:

This course creates awareness in the students that Training and Development is core component of organization development and brings bout growth and development of the enterprise. The importance of training and the competencies required to be able to manage this function in the corporate world are emphasized.

Topics to be covered include but not limited to:

  • Learning Theories and Principles
  • Identification of Training Needs
  • Design and Delivery of Training
  • Evaluating Training
  • E-Learning
  • Workplace Learning
  • Knowledge Management
  • Organisational Learning
  • Vocational Education
  • Continuing Professional Development and Life-Long Learning

 

Mode of delivery:

The course will be delivered through class lectures, case studies, group and individual assignments, discussions and presentations.

 

Reading Materials:

  1. Torrington, D., L. Hall, S. Taylor and C. Atkinson (1993). Human resource management Harlow: Financial Times Prentice Hall, 2011) eight edition Chapter 17 ‘Context, competence and competencies’.
  2. Blanchard, P. N. and Thacker, J. W. (2010) Effective Training: systems, strategies and practices, 4th edition, Pearson Education
  3. Gold, J., R. Holden, P. Iles, J. Stewart and J. Beardwell (2010) Human Resource Development: theory and practice . Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2010
  4. Armstrong, M. (2001) A handbook of human resource management practice. (London:
  5. Kogan Page,
  6. Blanchard, P. N. and Thacker, J. W. (2010) Effective Training: systems, strategies and practices, 4th edition, Pearson Education
  7. Wilson, John P (2012) International Human Resource Development: learning, education and training for individuals and organizations Kogan Page Publishers, London
  8. Nilson, Carolyn (2007) How to Manage Training; Facilitating Workplace Learning for High Performance. Amacom Publishers, London
  9. Lengnick-Hall, M & Lengnick-Hall C (2002) Human Resource Management in the Knowledge Economy Berrett-Koehler Publishers

HRCC302          

RECRUITMENT AND SELECTION

3 CREDITS


Objective
:

The main objective of this course is to develop the knowledge and skills of the student to be able to determine the manpower needs and to design and implement a comprehensive process for recruitment and selection to fill in the manpower gaps.

Content:

This course explains the theory and practices as well as the laws regarding recruitment and selection of personnel to fill the manpower needs of the organization.

The topics to be treated include but not limited to:

  • The strategic role of recruitment and selection
  • Job analysis, job description, job specifications
  • Competency profiling for jobs in the organization
  • The recruitment process
  • The selection process; interviewing, selection models; shortlisting and selection processes; reliability and validity of selection processes, legal issues and employment compensation packages
  • Orientation for newly selected employees

Mode of Delivery:

Learning will be facilitated through of lectures, tutorials, discussions, analysis of cases, individual and group assignments and presentations.

Reading Materials:

  1. Anderson, N. and V. Shackleton (1993) Successful selection interviewing. Oxford: Blackwell, 1993
  2. Gareth Roberts (2005). Recruitment and Selection. Chartered Institute of Personnel & Development; 2nd edition.
  3. Heinemann, Herbert G., III, & Judge, Timothy A. (2009). Staffing Organizations, Sixth Edition.
  4. Middleton, WI: Mendota House/McGraw-Hill Irwin
  5. Laroche, Lionel. (2007) Recruiting, retaining, and promoting culturally different employees, Amsterdam; Boston: Elsevier Butterworth-Heinemann,
  6. Torrington, D., L. Hall, S. Taylor and C. Atkinson (2011) Human resource management. (Harlow: Financial Times, 2011) eighth edition Chapter 7 ‘Recruitment’ and Chapter 8 ‘Selection methods and decisions’

GBEC401

FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT

3 CREDITS


Objective:

At the end of the course, students should be able to apply key financial tools and models for making key Accounting and Financial Management decisions in business contexts.

Content:

Students will be exposed to concepts, theories and practices in Accounting and Financial Management and how these are put together to create value or wealth for businesses.

Topics to be treated include but not limited to:

  • Time Value of Money
  • Valuation of Securities
  • Risk and Return
  • Capital Investment Decisions
  • Firm Valuation
  • Basics of Mergers and Acquisitions
  • Capital Budgeting
  • Dividend Policy
  • Debt Financing
  • Venture Capital and Entrepreneurial Finance.
  • Financial Markets and Financing Decisions
  • Leasing and Buying.

Mode of Delivery:

The course will be delivered lectures, case studies, PowerPoint presentations, individual and group assignments and discussions.

Reading Materials:

  1. Brigham, E. F., Ehrhardt, M. C. (2014) Accounting and Financial Management Theory and Practice.14th Edition, South-Western.
  2. Brigham, E.F. Gapenski, L.C and Ehrhardt, M.C. (1999) Accounting and Financial Management Theory and Practice. The Dryden Press, Harcourt Brace College Publishers, New York
  3. de Haan, J. (2012). Financial Markets and Institutions: A European
    1. 2nd Edition, Cambridge University Press.
  4. Penman Stephen H. (2012) Financial Statement Analysis and Security Valuation 5th: New York: McGraw-Hill Higher Education:
  5. Arnold, G. (2008) Corporate Accounting and Financial Management, 4th Edition, Prentice Hall, Financial Times
  6. Watson, D, and Head, A., (2008) Corporate Principles and Practice 5th Edition. Prentice Hall, Financial Times

GBEC402

INTEGRATIVE BUSINESS SIMULATION

1 CREDIT

In this course students be coached to integrate business concepts, evaluate ethical implications of decisions, and apply analytical skills to make decisions. The application of various simulation exercises would be used to help students engage in day-to-day business decision making involved in real life management of companies. Each simulation iteration would put students in decision making posture pertaining to core business functions including R&D, marketing, production, finance, HR, logistics and operations for the firm. Students would be encouraged to integrate their knowledge across the various subject areas of the programme so as to make good business decisions.

Text: None

GBEC403           

BUSINESS PLANNING 

3 CREDITS


Objective:

This course aims at developing the attitudes, skills and knowledge of students to approach the entrepreneurship activities professionally and to adopt the planning approach in all work related activities

Content:

This course seeks present the theory, principles and practices in business planning and to create the awareness in students that well-written plan will serve as a guide through the start-up phase of the business. It presents other advantages that could be derived from effective business planning including the establishment of benchmarks to measure the performance of business venture in comparison with expectations and industry standards as well as helping to attract necessary financing by demonstrating the feasibility of the venture and the level of thought and professionalism that was brought to the task.

Topics to be treated include but not limited to:

  • Meaning of Business Plans and related concepts
  • Theories of Business Planning
  • Steps in Business Plan Preparation
  • Approaches to identify potential business opportunities
  • Creating One’s Own Business Plan
  • Content of a standard marketable business plan:
  1. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
  2. INTRODUCTION: Background, Business Overview, Business Ownership, Governance and Management, Project Objectives,

iii. ORGANIZATION AND STAFFING CONSIDERATION: Organization Structure, Proposed Staffing and Remuneration, SWOT ANALYSIS,

  1. TECHNICAL AND OPERATIONAL CONSIDERATIONS: Product Description, Project Management,
  2. MARKET AND MARKETING CONSIDERATIONS: Sources of Revenue, Price Trends, Inducing Demand, Target Catchment Area(s),
  3. RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN,

vii. FINANCIAL CONSIDERATIONS: Key Assumptions and Notes, Proposed Project Cost, Projected Demand Schedule, Unit Price/Fee Schedule, Projected Revenue, Cost Projections, Total Project Cost, Loan Amount and Repayment Schedule, Projected Profit and Loss Account, Projected Cash Flow Statement, Projected Balance Sheet, Investment and Sensitivity Analysis

viii. CONCLUSION, ix. APPENDICES

At the end of the course the student should be able to develop an implementable business plan.

Mode of Delivery:

Learning in this course will be facilitated through lectures, guest speaking, tutorials, case studies, individual and group assignment, presentations and discussions.

Reference Materials:

  1. Business Development Bank of Canada. (2016a). Start-up financing. https://www.bdc.ca/en/about/who-we-are/pages/default.aspx
  2. Business Development Bank of Canada. (2016b).

https://www.bdc.ca/en/about/who-we-are/pages/default.aspx

  1. Chatterjee, S. (2013). Simple rules for designing business models. California Management Review, 55(2), 97-124.
  2. Hindle, K., & Mainprize, B. (2006). A systematic approach to writing and rating entrepreneurial business plans. The Journal of Private Equity, 9(3), 7-23.
  3. Karl Wiegers, 2019. Successful Business Analysis Consulting Strategies and Tips for Going it Alone. Independently published, Amazons.
  4. Kelley Bruns, Billie Johnson 2019. Mastering Business Analysis Standard Practices Seven Steps to the Next Level of Competency. J. Ross Publishing. Amazons

ETCC402

ENTREPRENEURSHIP 5: MANAGING BUSINESSES FOR HIGH-GROWTH

 

3 CREDITS

Objective:

In this course the student is exposed to the fundamental theories, principles and practices of effective and efficient business management for inducing growth

Content

This course examines the theoretical concepts and models explaining firm growth and the ways related challenges can be addressed. It provides perspectives on how students develop their own business or can work effectively in dynamic, high-growth firms.

Topics to be treated include but not limited to the following:

  • Concepts of business growth
  • Conditions necessitating high business growth
  • Business growth strategies for entrepreneurs
  • Internal and external constraints for business growth and remedial strategies
  • Contemporary best cases of successful growth in businesses
  • Maximising business returns
  • Strategic audits and company turnaround strategies

By the end of the course, students should be capable of developing international procurement strategy for small to medium firms.

Mode of delivery

Lectures, guest speaking, industrial visits, group discussions, presentations, and case study

Reference Materials:

  1. Osterwalder, A., Pigneur, Y., & Clark, T. (2010). Business model generation: A handbook for visionaries, game changers, and challengers. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley.
  2. Ries, E. (2011). The lean startup: How today’s entrepreneurs use continuous innovation to create radically successful businesses. New York: Crown Business
  3. Chatterjee, S. (2013). Simple rules for designing business models. California Management Review, 55(2), 97-124.
  4. Hindle, K., & Mainprize, B. (2006). A systematic approach to writing and rating entrepreneurial business plans. The Journal of Private Equity, 9(3), 7-23.
  5. Karl Wiegers, 2019. Successful Business Analysis Consulting Strategies and Tips for Going it Alone. Independently published, Amazons.
  6. Kelley Bruns, Billie Johnson 2019. Mastering Business Analysis Standard Practices Seven Steps to the Next Level of Competency. J. Ross Publishing. Amazons

GBEC404          

PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT 

3 CREDITS

 

Objective:

The objective of this course is to make students understand the rudiments and essence of performance management and how it is designed and implemented effectively in the work organization.

Content:

This course presents how organizational mission, vision, values and goals are aligned with performance management system design.  It emphasises that performance is a two-way affair have implications for the employee as well as the employer.

Topics to be discussed include but not limited to the following:

  • Strategic importance of performance management
  • Legal and other environmental factors influencing performance management
  • Performance management and strategic planning
  • Performance appraisal
  • The Balanced Score Card (BSC) approach to Performance Management
  • Individual and group decision-making skills
  • Employee orientation
  • Employee ability and performance
  • Motivation and incentive systems
  • Job satisfaction, retention, and employee engagement.

At the end of the course students should be able to design simple performance management systems for business organizations and craft strategies for enhancing performance.

Mode of delivery:

Learning in this course will be facilitated through lectures, guest speaking, tutorials, case studies, individual and group assignment, presentations and discussions.

Reference Materials:

1.    Michael Armstrong, Performance Management: Key Strategies and Practical Guidelines, 3rd Edition, Kogan Page Limited Philadelphia (January 2006)

2.    Bacal Robert (2011) Performance Management 2nd Edition. McGraw-Hill Education;

3.    Mathis, R. L., & Jackson, J. (January 2015). Human resource management: Essential perspectives. Cengage Learning

4.    Phillips, J, & Gully, S. (2018). Human Resource Management. Mason, OH: South-Western 2nd Edition

5.    Martin, Graeme, (2006) Managing people and organisations in changing context. Oxford: Elsevier,

6.    Torrington, D., L. Hall, S. Taylor and C. Atkinson (February 2014).Human resource management Harlow: Financial Times Prentice Hall,Ninth edition

7.    Gold, J., R. Holden, P. Iles, J. Stewart and J. Beardwell (2010) Human resource  development: theory and practice . Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2010

8.    Armstrong, M. (February 2017) A handbook of human resource management practice. (London: Kogan Page,

9.    Wilson, John P (October 2012) International human resource development: learning, education and training for individuals and organizations Kogan Page Publishers, London

10.  Lengnick-Hall, M & Lengnick-Hall C (2002) Human Resource Management in the Knowledge Economy Berrett-Koehler Publishers


GBEC405

ETHICS AND SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY

3 CREDITS


Objective:

To course is intended to understand the fundamental principles of Ethics and Social Responsibility so they can be aware of how business decisions, operations and behaviours raise ethical concerns socially and legally.

Contents:

The course seeks make a strong case to students on how managers can balance the profitability needs of stakeholders and the needs of society.

Topics to be treated include but not limited to:

  • Philosophy of Ethics
  • Values based Leadership
  • Religious Ethics
  • Corruption
  • Social responsibilities of managers
  • External and internal environment of businesses

Mode of Delivery:

Learning will be facilitated in this course through a lectures, case studies, guest speaking, tutorials, class assignments and discussions.

Reading Materials:

1.    Ferrell, Fredric, and Ferrell, (January 2018). Business ethics: ethical decision making and Cases, 9 edition. Mason, Ohio: South-Western Cengage Learning

2.    Vogel, David, (2005).The market for virtue the potential and limits of corporate social responsibility. Washington, D.C. : Brookings Institution Press,

3.    Boston, MA (1999). Business and society: corporate strategy, public policy, ethics. Irwin/McGraw-Hill,

4.    Greenwood, William T., editor. (1964). Issues in business and society; readings and cases. Boston, Houghton Mifflin

5.    Griseri, Paul. (2010). Business ethics and corporate social. responsibility South-Western Cengage Learning

GBEC406

LEADERSHIP

3 CREDITS


Objective:

The main objective is for the students to understand the concept of leadership in relation to managing corporate entities and the dynamic role leaders play to bring about success in the firm.

Content:

The theories and principles of leadership as well as the differences between management and leadership is carefully explained to the student. Students are made to understand that leadership is a complex responsibility that it relates to successful implementation of business strategy.

Topics that will be discussed include but not limited to:

  • Leadership and Management
  • Leadership and Power
  • Leadership and Coercion
  • Approaches to Leadership
  • Types of Leadership
  • The Balanced Scorecard
  • Leadership and Ethics
  • Effective delegation, motivation, development of employees
  • Group dynamics, team building, managing conflict
  • Effective communication

Mode of Delivery:

Learning in this course will be facilitated through lecturers, guest speaking, case studies, tutorials, class assignments and discussions including students’ leadership vision sharing.

Reference Materials:

1.    Bass, Bernard M. (1985). Leadership and performance beyond expectations. New York: Free

2.    Press.

3.    Bass, Bernard M., Bass, Ruth and Stogdill, Ralph M. (November 2008). The Bass handbook of leadership:

4.    theory, research, and managerial applications. New York: Free Press.

5.    Bryman, Alan (March 2011). The SAGE handbook of leadership. Los Angeles, [Calif.], London:

6.    Chemers, Martin M. and Ayman, Roya (1992). Leadership theory and research: perspectives and directions. Academic Press.

7.    Gold, Jeffrey, Thorpe, Richard and Mumford, Alan (April 2016). Gower handbook of leadership and management development. Farnham: Gower.

8.    Northouse, Peter Guy (March 2017) Leadership: theory and practice. Thousand Oaks: SAGE.

9.    Rowe W. G. and Guerrero L. (eds) (March 2018). Cases in leadership. Los Angeles: SAGE.

10.  Yukl, Gary A. (February 2012). Leadership in organizations. Upper Saddle River, N.J.: Pearson Education.a

GBEC407

STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT

3 CREDITS


Objective:

The objective of this course is to develop a strategic thinking mind-set in the students and to understand the strategic management process.

Content:

This course will present a general overview of strategic management to the students. This will entail strategy analysis (internal and external), formulation of strategies at different levels of the organization, and strategy implementation.

Topics to be treated include but not limited to:

  • Introduction to strategic management
  • External environment analysis
  • Internal environment analysis
  • SWOT/TOWS Analysis and Key Issues derivation
  • Business strategy
  • Corporate strategy
  • International strategy
  • Cooperate strategy
  • Strategic leadership
  • Ethical reasoning, organisation structure and controls.

Upon completion of this course, students should be able to apply all the knowledge and skills and develop a workable strategic plan.

Mode of Delivery:

Learning will be facilitated through class discussions, lecturers, case studies, assignments, power point presentation and discussions.

Reading Materials:

1.    Ireland D., Hoskisson, R. E. & Hitt, M. A.( 2011). The management of strategy concepts (9th edition). Mason, Ohio: South-Western Cengage

2.    David, Fred (2014). Strategic management: Concepts and cases, 14th Edition Publisher: Pearson Prentice Hall.

3.    De Wit, Bob, & Ron Meyer (2010). Strategy process, content, Context: An international Perspective, fourth edition, London: Thomson Learning.

4.    Bartlett, C., Ghoshal, S. and Beamish, P. (March 2010). Transnational management, McGraw Hill, 5e

5.    Barney, J.B. and Hesterly, W.S. (January 2016).  Strategic management and competitive advantage, third edition. Prentice Hall.

6.    Marcus, A.A. (April 2016). Management strategy, McGraw Hill,

7.    Wheelen, T.L., Hunger, J.D., Hoffman, A.N. &  Bamford, C.E. (september 2017). Concepts in strategic management and business policy. Pearson, 14th edition


GBEC409

LONG ESSAY I / PROJECT I

3 CREDITS

This course is intended to develop the capacity of the student to harness and integrate the knowledge and skills acquired across the other subject including research methods to be able to embark on an original and independent research work leading to a research project report. The course emphasizes innovativeness and is problem solving oriented. In some cases students may be encouraged to use the research data to emphasis is on develop a marketable business plan for a new product that for which the market potential has been estimated. Such a plan is expected to be supported by a strong business case analysis. The purpose is to encourage entrepreneurial initiatives among the students. Alternatively students may choose to elect to do a long Essay.

Text: None

GBEC410

LONG ESSAY II / PROJECT II

3 CREDITS

 

This course is a continuation and completion phase of the Long Essay Ii / Project I. Students are supported through supervision mostly to complete either the business/marketing plans or the long essays they began in the previous semester so that they can make presentations in various seminars until the final defence of their concepts or prototypes. Through this process students will reinforce their teamwork culture acquired during the programme and learn the practicalities of running a business, for instance, protecting inventions with patents and trademarks.

Text: None

HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT: ELECTIVES

HRCC401           

EMPLOYMENT AND LABOUR LAW 

3 CREDITS


Objective:

The main objective is to develop the knowledge and skills of students in labour law so that the student can understand what constitutes legal and illegal labour management practices and to also be able to determine courses of action to take in situations of conflict between employer and employees.

 

Content:

The course focuses on Labour Law and discusses labour unions, labour law in relation to the rights and responsibilities of workers.

Topics to be treated include but not limited to:

  • Nature of the employee-employer relationship
  • Nature of the employment contract
  • Role of trade unions
  • Discipline and dismissals
  • Other legal rules that apply in the workplace
  • Labour law and non-unionized organizations

At end of course, students should be able to determine remedies available for simple workplace labour-management conflicts.

Mode of Delivery:

Learning in this course will be facilitated through lectures, guest speaking, tutorials, case studies, individual and group assignment, presentations and discussions.

Reference Materials:

1.    Blanpin R (Ed) (1982) Comparative Labour Law and Industrial Relations Kluwer, Deventer.

2.    Cihon Patrick J. (January 2016) Employment and Labor Law 8th Edition K&C HR Enterprises, and Associate Provost/Legal Counsel, Rider University

3.    Collins, Hugh & Ewing K, D. (October 2019) Labor Law. Aileen McColgan, Kings College, London

4.    Obeng-Fosu, Patrick. (1999) Industrial Relations in Ghana The Law and Practice.  Ghana Universities Press, Accra Ghana.

5.    Republic of Ghana (2010) .Alternative Dispute Resolution Act, 2010, Act 794

6.    Republic of Ghana (2010) Courts Act, 1993, (Act 459) of Ghana

7.    Republic of Ghana (2010) Labour Act, 2003 (Act 651) of Ghana          

8.    Republic of Ghana (1965). Industrial Relations Act (Act 299) Accra.  State Publishing Corporation

HRCC402

HUMAN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT

3 CREDITS


Objective:

The main objective of this course is to introduce the student to the concept of Human Resource Development (HRD), how it is practiced in excellent organizations and the impact this has on the long run profitability and competitiveness of firms.

Content:

The topics that will be discussed in this course include but not limited to:

  • The nature and scope of HRD theory and practice
  • Training and development (T&D) needs assessment
  • Training design, implementation and evaluation
  • Strategic HRD,
  • HRD learning and change
  • Leadership, talent management and HRD
  • HRD in large and small enterprises
  • Skills development
  • Graduate employability,
  • Skills and technical training
  • Coaching and performance management
  • International HRD

Upon completion of the course the students should be able to conduct competency profiling and gap analysis for jobs, pal and implement HRD for small organizations and design simple performance management systems.

Mode of Delivery:

Learning in this course will be facilitated through lectures, guest speaking, tutorials, case studies, individual and group assignment, presentations and discussions.

Reference Materials:

  1. Carbery Roam & Cross Christine (2015) Human Resource Development: A Concise Introduction Palgrave Macmillan
  2. McGoldrick Jim; Stewart Jim (2002) Understanding human resource development; a research-based approach Routledge
  3. Lee Monica (2003) HRD in a complex world Routledge, 2003
  4. McGuire David (2014) Human Resource Development 2nd ed. Edition: SAGE Publications Ltd;
  5. Woodall Jean & Lee Monica Lee ;( 2004) New Frontiers in HRD Routledge, 2004
  6. Werner Jon M.and DeSimone Randy (2012) Human Resource Development. Cengage Learning.
  7. Gold, J., Holden, R., Iles, P., Stewart, J. & Beardwell, J., (2013) Human Resource Development: theory and practice, 2nd edition Palgrave Macmillan.
  8. McGuire, D. (2014) Human Resource Development: theory and practice, 2nd Edition, Sage Publications.
  9. McConnell John H. (2011) Auditing Your Human Resources Department: A Step-by-Step Guide to Assessing the Key Areas of Your Program Hardcover AMACOM; 2 editions
  10. Rao T.V. (2014) HRD Evaluating the Human Resource Function for Business Improvement. Sage Publishing. Ahmedabad, India

HRCC404

STRATEGIC HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

3 CREDITS


Objective
:

The main objective is to build the knowledge and skills of the student to envision Human Resources Management in a more strategic perspective and be able to align the long term Human Resources Plan with the Strategic Plan of the organization.

Content:

This course presents an in-depth discussion on how to situate the concept of Human Resources management in the context of strategic thinking and how the intellectual capital can be managed to derive sustainable competitive advantage.

The topics to be discussed include but not limited to the following:

  • Strategic Thinking and the HRM function
  • Strategic Human Resources Management Plans
  • Reward systems
  • High-performance human resource systems
  • Strategy and competitive advantage
  • Strategic occupational safety, health and security
  • Linking HR to business strategy,
  • Talent management
  • Succession planning
  • Organizational Culture
  • Change Management

By the end of the course students should be able to develop a strategic human resources plan for business organizations showing the strategies the will create the distinctive competencies among the labour force and hence the source of sustainable competitive advantage to be enjoyed.

Mode of Delivery:

Learning in this course will be facilitated through lectures, guest speaking, tutorials, case studies, individual and group assignment, presentations and discussions.

Reference Materials:

  1. Salaman, G, Storey, J & Billsberry (2006) Strategic Human Resource Management Theory and Practice, Second Edition, SAGE Publications Ltd
  2. Truss, C; Mankin, D; & Keliher (2012) Strategic Human Resource Management 1st Edition Oxford University Press; 1 edition
  3. Greer, C. (2000). Strategic Human Resource Management: A General Managerial Approach (2nd Edition) 2nd Edition Prentice Hall; 2 edition (December 7, 2000)
  4. Schuler, R; & Jackson (2007). Strategic Human Resource Management 2nd Edition Wiley-Blackwell;
  5. Ulrich, Dave. (1998) Human Resource Champions: The Next Agenda for Adding Value and Delivering Results. Boston, MA: Harvard Business School Press,
  6. Reese, Charles D. (2015) Occupational Health and Safety Management: A Practical Approach, Third Edition CRC Press, London
  7. Allan St. John Holt & Jim Allen (2009) Principles of Health and Safety at Work (Paperback) Taylor & Francis Ltd, London
  8. Ferret Ed (2012) Health and Safety at Work. Routledge Taylor and Francis Group, London

Hughes Phil & Ferret Ed. (2011). Introduction to Health and Safety at Work 5th Ed. Routledge Taylor and Francis Group, London

ACCOUNTING AND FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT: ELECTIVES

FMCC301          

INVESTMENT AND  PORTFOLIO MANAGEMENT

3 CREDITS


Objective
:

This course aims at making students understand the concept of investment and portfolio management decision making in banks and other corporate/financial institutions.

Content:

This course enables students to structure investments and manage portfolios of banks and non-bank financial institutions.

Topics to be treated include but not limited to:

  • Investments appraisal and feasibility reporting
  • Portfolio optimization techniques
  • Portfolio theory
  • Determination of asset covariance, correlation,
  • Portfolio planning and selection,
  • Portfolio diversification and capital asset pricing model.
  • Investment policy,
  • Types, nature and purpose of investments
  • Investment decision making
  • Factors affecting investment decisions
  • Fund management,
  • Asset management
  • Investment environment, risks and returns.
  • Modeling of mergers and acquisitions,
  • Strategic buyouts and security analysis
  • Capital market investments, money market investments
  • Efficient market hypothesis and best practices in investments.

At the end of the course the student should be able to structure investments and manage the financial investment portfolio of a bank or non-bank financial institution

 

Mode of Delivery:

This course will be facilitated by lectures, review of cases, quizzes, debates, assignments, research mini-projects and Power-Point presentations

 

References Materials:

  1. Viet E. Theodore and Michael R Murphy (1992) Ethics of  Portfolio management and

      Investment Profession, Chartered Institute of Financial Analysts

  1. Haim L. and Thierry P.(2011) Investments, Published by Prentice Hall , Fifth Edition
  2. Olufowose E. A .(1998) Monetary Theory and Investments Practice, Fourth Edition
  3. Homes P. (1998) Investment Appraisal, Thomson Business Press

FMCC302          

MONETARY AND FINANCIAL SYSTEMS

3 CREDITS


Objective
:

The main objective of this course is to develop the knowledge students on the functions of money, financial institutions and financial markets.

Content:

The course discusses how monetary and economic policies for the financial services industry and domestic and international regulatory frameworks impact the operations of financial intermediaries. 

Topics to be discussed include but not limited to:

  • Structure of financial markets and systems in Ghana
  • Money supply
  • Inflation
  • Interest rates
  • Exchange rates,
  • Theory of balance of payment.

By the end of the course the student should be able to carry out financial forecasts needed for informing financial decisions of organizations.

 

Mode of Delivery:

Learning will be facilitated through of lectures, tutorials, discussions, analysis of cases, individual and group assignments and presentations.

 

Reference Materials:

1.    Incoom S.E., (2010): The monetary and financial system 2nd edition. Accra, Prime

2.    Applications

3.    Gali, J. (July 2015), Monetary Policy, Inflation and the Business Cycle: An Introduction to the New Keynesian Framework. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press

4.    Howells, P. G. A. and Bain, K. (2008), The Economics of Money, Banking and Finance: An European Text. Harlow, Essex: Pearson

5.    Howells, P. G. A. and Bain, K. (2009), Monetary Economics: Policy and its Theoretical Basis. Basingstoke, U.K.: Palgrave MacMillan.

6.    Mishkin, F. S. (2012), The Economics of Money, Banking and Financial Market. Harlow, Essex: Pearson.

 

GBEC401

FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT

3 CREDITS

 

Objective:

At the end of the course, students should be able to apply key financial tools and models for making key Accounting and Financial Management decisions in business contexts.

 

Content:

Students will be exposed to concepts, theories and practices in Accounting and Financial Management and how these are put together to create value or wealth for businesses.

Topics to be treated include but not limited to:

  • Time Value of Money
  • Valuation of Securities
  • Risk and Return
  • Capital Investment Decisions
  • Firm Valuation
  • Basics of Mergers and Acquisitions
  • Capital Budgeting
  • Dividend Policy
  • Debt Financing
  • Venture Capital and Entrepreneurial Finance.
  • Financial Markets and Financing Decisions
  • Leasing and Buying.

Mode of Delivery:

The course will be delivered lectures, case studies, PowerPoint presentations, individual and group assignments and discussions.

Reading Materials:

1.    Brigham, E. F., Ehrhardt, M. C. (January 2016) Financial Management Theory and Practice. South-Western.)

2.    Brigham, E.F. Gapenski, L.C and Ehrhardt, M.C. (January 2016) Financial Management Theory and Practice. The Dryden Press, Harcourt Brace College Publishers, New York

3.    de Haan, J. (August 2016). Financial Markets and Institutions: A European

4.    Perspective. 2nd Edition, Cambridge University Press.

5.    Penman Stephen H.(January 2012) Financial Statement Analysis and Security Valuation 5th ed.:New York: McGraw-Hill Higher Education:

6.    Arnold, G.(May 2019) Corporate Financial Management, 6th Edition, Prentice Hall, Financial Times

7.    Watson, D, and Head, A., (June 2016) Corporate Finance. Principles and Practice   Prentice Hall, Financial Times

FMCC402

FINANCIAL STATEMENT ANALYSIS

3 CREDITS


Objective:

This course focuses on the principles and practices of financial reporting. The main objective is to equip students with tools of corporate reporting and analysis so as to be able to make key financial decisions. 

Content:

The course critically coaches students to extract and analyse relevant financial data from financial statements and other financial reports so as to be able to make decisions regarding investments, borrowing and other key managerial decisions.

Key topics to be treated include but not limited to:

  • Methods of constructing, comparing and analysing financial statements and reports
  • Uses of financial analyses
  • Concepts of accrual accounting and financial information
  • Interpret annual reports
  • Assessment of financial strength of firms using ratio analysis.
  • Effect of accounting choices and estimates on interpretation of financial data.

At end of the course, students are expected to exhibit in-depth knowledge and understanding of professional and ethical responsibilities as well as the competencies of a typical finance Manager of a firm

Mode of Delivery:

The Course will be delivered through lectures, case analysis, tutorials, PowerPoint presentations, individual and group assignments and discussions.

Reading Materials:

  1. ACCA (2016). Study text-corporate reporting: Aldine Place – London, BPP Learning Media..
  2. Addo A.,(2013) Advanced financial reporting. (2nd) Accra
  3. David Y. & Jacob C. (2013) corporate reporting and analysis. (3rd) New York: Addison and Wesley.
  4. ICAG (2015). Study test-corporate financial reporting. London: BPP Learning Media
  5. International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS)
  6. Lewis R., & Pendril D., (2003). Advanced accounting. (7th) Britian: Pearson Education.
  7.  

FMCC404

INTERNATIONAL TRADE FINANCE

3 CREDITS


Objective
:

This course is designed to expose students to the concepts in international trade and finance and to have a deep knowledge of the international financial environment and how it affects businesses.

Content:

The course discusses the methods and instruments employed to finance international trade, foreign exchange and related ancillary services provided to exporters and importers through financial intermediations.

Topics to be treated include bur not limited to:

  • International financial markets
  • International payment systems
  • Documentary credit and collection
  • Documents used in international trade and incoterms
  • International Financial risk management.

At end of the course students should be able to advice in a consulting posture the international financing arrangements needed by medium scale companies.

 

Mode of Delivery:

Learning in this course will be facilitated through lectures, guest speaking, tutorials, case studies, individual and group assignment, presentations and discussions.

Reference Materials:

  1. Atuahene, R. K. (2005), Finance of International Trade: Bankers Workbook Series. Accra: The Chartered Institute of Bankers (Gh).
  2. Cowdell, P. and Hyde D. (2008), International Trade Finance. Eighth Edition. Hastings, East Sussex: Financial World Publishing.
  3. Madura, J. (January 2015), International Corporate Finance. Tenth (International) Edition. Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.

ENTREPRENEURSHIP ELECTIVES:

ETCC301          

ENTREPRENEURSHIP 2: MANAGING INNOVATION

 

3 CREDITS

Objective:

This course aims at making students understand the theories and principles of innovation and how this can be applied to solving business problems. 

 

Content:

This course presents how to manage innovation considering its importance and impact at variety of levels. The need to innovate cannot be over emphasized in view of how this leads to growth, competitive advantage, business survival and for societal wellness.

Topics to be covered include but not limited to:

  • Meaning and strategic imperative of innovate
  • Theories of innovation
  • Management of innovation in different organisational settings
  • Managing the innovation process
  • Relationships between innovation strategy and corporate culture.
  • Structural barrier to innovation – organisational tensions and challenges
  • Open innovation versus user innovation

By the end of the course, the student should be able to develop and present innovative solutions to real life business problems.

Mode of delivery:

The course will be delivered through class lectures, live material case studies, group and individual assignments, discussions and presentations.

Reading Materials:

  1. Melissa A. Schilling, 2016. Strategic Management of Technological Innovation. Irwin Management – 5th Edition. McGraw-Hill Higher Education.
  1. Melissa Schilling, 2019. Strategic Management of Technological Innovation; 6th Edition.

McGraw-Hill Higher Education.

  1. Keith Goffin and Rick Mitchell, 2017. Innovation Management: Effective strategy and implementation 3rd ed.
  1. Tony Davila, Marc Epstein, Robert Shelton, 2013. Making Innovation Work: How to Manage It, Measure It, and Profit from It. Pearson Education

ETCC302          

ENTREPRENEURSHIP 3: KEY SKILLS FOR BUSINESS

3 CREDITS


Objective
:

The objective of this course is to enable the students understand the entrepreneurial competencies required to be successful in the field of work and how these are acquired or developed.

Content:

This course presents to students experiential learning in practical and applied skills needed by entrepreneurs at the world of work. Students will be presented with a range of skills and competencies in the areas of communication, teamwork, leadership, ethics and problem-solving. The course prepares students to appreciate of the complexities of organizational life and how to attain peak performance under pressure.

Topics to be treated include but not limited to:

  • Theory of skills audit and gap analysis
  • Applied and tacit areas of knowledge
  • Novel ways of training,
  • Contextual factors in business education
  • Practical challenges of the workplace in relation to information and decision-making
  • Techniques for prioritizing, managing workload and meeting deadlines

At the end of the course students should be able to appreciate ideas from different perspectives and use multiple framing to deepen your understanding of complex phenomena

Mode of Delivery:

Learning will be facilitated through lectures, guest lecturers to provide professional insights, tutorials, discussions, analysis of cases, individual and group assignments and presentations.

Reference Materials:

  1. Jim Collins and Jerry I. Porras, 2004. Built to Last: Successful Habits of Visionary Companies. Amazons.
  2. Tim Ferriss, 2016. Tools of Titans: The Tactics, Routines, and Habits of Billionaires, Icons, and World-Class Performers.
  3. Gary Vaynerchuk, 2018. Crushing It: How Great Entrepreneurs Build Their Business and

    Influence-and How You Can Too. Harper Business

  1. Malcolm Gladwell, 2011. Outliers: The Story of Success. Back Bay Books.
  2. Cal Newport, 2016. Deep Work: Rules for Focused Success in a Distracted World.

ETCC403          

ENTREPRENEURSHIP 6: CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS

3 CREDITS

Objective:

This course aims at building the knowledge, skills and attitudes of students so they can appreciate and incorporate corporate social responsibility (CSR) and sustainable business (SB) principles in their business decisions.

Content:

This course presents how

This course presents the concepts corporate social responsibility (CSR) and sustainable business (SB), what they mean and how these concepts are being embraced in today’s business organizations and their effects.

Topics to be discussed include but not limited to the following:

  • Stakeholder theory
  • Role and strategic importance of CSR in SB in contemporary business organizations
  • Frames of reference in strategic significance of CSR and SB
  • Business decision making and CSR and SB considerations
  • Relationship between CSR and SB and innovation
  • How CSR and SB drive new business opportunities
  • CSR and SB contribution to solution of business, social and environmental problems – cases
  • Role and importance of non-financial reporting
  • At the end of the course students should be able to thoroughly assess existing CSR initiatives in businesses and prescribe appropriate courses of managerial action from a range of alternatives

Mode of delivery:

Learning in this course will be facilitated through lectures, guest speaking, tutorials, case studies, individual and group assignment, presentations and discussions.

 

Reference Materials:

  1. Michael Hopkins, 2017. CSR and Sustainability. Routledge. Amazons.
  2. David Chandler, 2018. Strategic Corporate Social Responsibility: Sustainable Value Creation, Fifth Edition. SAGE Publications, Inc.
  3. Renata Myskova and Petr Hajek, 2018. Sustainability and Corporate Social Responsibility in the Text of Annual Reports—The Case of the IT Services Industry.

     https://www.mdpi.com/2071-1050/10/11/4119/htm

  1. Lenssen, Gilbert G., Smith, Craig (Eds.), 2019. Managing Sustainable Business; An Executive Education Case and Textbook. Springer
  2. Conrad, Christian A., 2018. Business Ethics – A Philosophical and Behavioral Approach. Springer.

 

LOGISTICS AND SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT: ELECTIVES

PTCC301          

LOGISTICS AND SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT OF GOODS, WORKS AND SERVICES.

 

3 CREDITS

Objective:

This course aims at making students understand the theories principles and practices of procurement relating to goods, works and services procurement.

Content:

This course creates awareness in the students about the processes by which goods, works and services are acquired in the public sector organizations and project environments.  It also discusses the legal issues that confront public and project managers in public procurement administration. 

Topics to be covered include but not limited to:

  • Procurement law of Ghana
  • Contract and procurement strategies
  • Source selection
  • Contract type identification
  • Product liability and risk
  • Tender documents
  • Invitation to bid
  • Bid responses and evaluation
  • Contract risk assessment
  • Contract negotiation and procurement conflict resolution.

By the end of the course, the student should be able to prepare and implement a Logistics and Supply Chain Management plan for Goods, Works and Services.

Mode of delivery:

The course will be delivered through class lectures, case studies, group and individual assignments, discussions and presentations.

Reading Materials:

  1. Public Procurement Act of Ghana
  2. Public Procurement Manual of Public Procurement Authority (PPA)
  3. World Bank Procurement Manual on Works, Goods and Services Procurement

PTCC302           

LOGISTICS AND SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT

3 CREDITS


Objective
:

The objective of this course is to enable the students understand the impact of procurement decisions on the broader value chain of organisations.

Content:

Topics to be treated include but not limited to:

  • Definition of Supply Chain Management
  • Goals of Supply Chain
  • Globalization and Global Competition
  • Link between procurement and other key elements of the supply chain.
  • Organizing for Supply Chain Management
  • Supply Chain Management in Manufacturing and Services
  • Supply Chain Information Systems and Electronic Commerce
  • Drivers of New Supply Chain System and Applications
  • Concept of Value Chain and its Implication in Supply Chain Management
  • The Role of Logistics In Supply Chain Management
  • Justin-Time or Real-Time processes
  • Kanban systems

At the end of the course students should be able to design and implement supply chain strategies for effective management of flow of goods and services

Mode of Delivery:

Learning will be facilitated through of lectures, tutorials, discussions, analysis of cases, individual and group assignments and presentations.

Reference Materials:

  1. Christopher, M. 2010. Logistics and Supply Chain Management. Harlow:

Pearson Education Ltd.

  1. Rushton, A. 2006. The Handbook of Logistics and Distribution Manage-

ment. London: Kogan Page.

PTCC401          

NATIONAL AND INTERNATIONAL NEGOTIATION 

3 CREDITS


Objective:

The main objective is to develop the knowledge, skills and attitudes required of students to be effective negotiators in local and international procurement settings.

Content:

The course established the understanding of culturally induced drivers and forward looking tactically advantageous guidance to ensure success in national and international negotiation context. The course develops the cross-disciplinary knowledge of the student in negotiation.

Topics to be treated include but not limited to:

  • Intercultural frameworks
  • Structure and Conduct negotiations in National and International
  • Environments
  • Analyzing Backgrounds for Successful Negotiations
  • Evaluation of Psychological and Behavioral Drivers in and for Negotiations
  • Develop Strategic Objectives and use Tactical Tools for Achievement of Desired Outcomes

At the end of the course the student should be able to structure, prepare and conduct negotiations in a national and international environment by developing strategic objectives and use of tactical tools for the achievement of desired outcomes.

Mode of Delivery:

Learning in this course will be facilitated through lectures, guest speaking, tutorials, case studies, individual and group assignment, presentations and discussions.

Reference Materials:

  1. Thussu, D. 2009. International Communication: A Reader. London: Bloomsburry Academic.
  2. Moran, R.T., Harris, P.R. and Moran, S.V. 2009. Managing Cultural Differences:
  3. Global Leadership Strategies for Cross-cultural Business Success. Oxford: Butterworth-Heinemann. Website: geert-hofstede.com

PTCC402

INTERNATIONAL LOGISTICS AND SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT

3 CREDITS


Objective:

In this course the student is exposed to the fundamental theories, principles and practices of international procurement process

Content

This course discusses the concept of International Procurement and looks at in-depth presentation of the International Procurement Procedures as well as the nature of the environment in which international Procurement takes place.

Topics to be treated include but not limited to the following:

  • Definition of international procurement
  • Differences and similarities between national and international procurement
  • Rationale for international procurement
  • Scope of international procurement environment
  • Stakeholders and their roles
  • The legal framework
  • The international procurement procedures
  • Clearing and customs procedures
  • International commercial terms
  • Payment procedures
  • Skills in international procurement
  • Challenges in international Logistics and Supply Chain Management

By the end of the course, students should be capable of developing international procurement strategy for small to medium firms.

Mode of delivery

Lectures, guest speaking, industrial visits, group discussions, presentations, and case study

Reference Materials:

  1. Russell, R.S. and Taylor, B.W. 2010. Operations Management: Creating

Value alongside the Supply Chain. 6th ed Hoboken: John Wiley & Sons Inc.

  1. Mangan, J., Lalwani, C. and Butcher, C. 2008. Global Logistics and Supply Chain

Management. Hoboken: John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

PTCC404

E-PROCUREMENT AND E-SUPPLY CHAIN

3 CREDITS


Objective
:

The main objective is building the knowledge and skills of the student to understand and apply the essentials of e-commerce to Logistics and Supply Chain Management.

Content:

This course presents an in-depth discussion on how Information Communication Technologies (ICT) can be deployed in (e-) procurement how this has opened new ways for procurement and

Supply Chain Management as well as the new and different challenges brought to the procurement profession and its management.

The topics to be discussed include but not limited to the following:

  • ICT as strategic tool for improving procurement practices
  • ICT and optimization of the supply chain.
  • ICT and networking alliances in the supply chain
  • ICT and effective vendor management
  • ICT and Real-Time inventory management
  • ICT and e-opportunities.

By the end of the course students should be able to structure and design e-supply chains and their management and manage procurement relationships in small to medium firms by the profound use of ICT.

Mode of Delivery:

Learning in this course will be facilitated through lectures, guest speaking, tutorials, case studies, individual and group assignment, presentations and discussions. Examples of best practice in which high levels of interaction between lecturers and students will be used extensively to facilitate learning.

Reference Materials:

  1. Neef, D. 2001. E-procurement: From Strategy to Implementation. Upper Saddle River: Prentice Hall.
  2. Chaffey, D. 2011. E-business and E-commerce Management: Strategy, Implementation and Practice. 5th ed Harlow: Prentice Hall.

ELECTIVE: One Level 400 Specialisation Course from Any Other Programme

  • Assessment of students’ performance and achievements:

Regulations on students’ assessment, performance and achievements should be clearly defined and there should be evidence of students’ awareness of the regulations.

Each course will have an evaluation system consisting of supervised written examinations, case assignments, projects, etc. The specific weights of each component shall be determined within the guidelines approved by the Academic Board. The evaluation system must be detailed in a syllabus to be provided to students at the beginning of each course.

Typically, the following scoring (weighting) scheme will apply in the evaluation of students’ performance:

  • Final Examinations – 60%
  • Continuous Assessment – 40

Continuous assessment includes term papers, class assignments, syndicate work, quizzes, case studies, class tests, class attendance, among others.

Evaluation by Students

During each semester, each student will be requested to evaluate the courses they took, by completing an evaluation form under conditions of confidentiality and anonymity.

Grading System

The grading system is as follows:           

LETTER GRADING

NUMERICAL PERCENTAGE

GRADE POINT

INTERPRETATION

A

75-100

4.00

Distinction

A-

70-74

3.75

Excellent

B+

65-69

3.50

Very Good

B

60-64

3.00

Good

C+

55- 59

2.50

Average

C

50-54

2.00

Average

C-

45-49

1.75

Weak

D

30-44

1.5

Fail

F

Below 30

1.0

Fail

X

0

Absent

I

Incomplete

Z

Disqualified

Grade Z: Failure due to DISQUALIFICATION from an examination as a result
of an examination malpractice or offence as determined by the Academic Board.

 

Grade I: Denotes INCOMPLETE and is awarded to a student who is unable to
complete a course for reasons adjudged by the Academic Board as satisfactory.

 

Grade X: A grade X shall be awarded to a student who absents
himself/herself from examinations without any satisfactory reasons. It is a
failed grade which attracts zero (0) awarded to the student.

Grade Point (GP)

For each (letter) Grade there is a
corresponding Grade Point as indicated above. 
The Grade Point earned by a student for each course completed is
computed as the product of the number of credits (credit units) for the course
and the Grade Point equivalent of the (letter) grade obtained in the course.

Grade Point Average
(GPA)

The Grade Point Average is obtained by
dividing the sum of the Grade Points obtained by the total number of credits
(credit units) of courses completed. 
A student does not earn credits for an F grade.

Cumulative Grade Point
Average (CGPA)            

A student’s cumulative grade point average
is calculated by dividing the total number of Grade Point obtained, up to any
specified time, by the total number of credits for all courses for which the
student has completed up to that time.

Final Grade Point
Average (FGPA)           

The FGPA is the CGPA for all courses for
which the student has registered up to the end of the academic
programme.

 

 

 

CLASSIFICATION

CLASS

CUMMULATIVE GRADE POINT AVERAGE (CGPA)

FIRST CLASS

 3.65  –  4.00

SECOND CLASS UPPER DIVISION

 3.25  –  3.64

SECOND CLASS LOWER DIVISION

 2.60  –  3.24

THIRD CLASS

 2.00  –  2.59

PASS

 1.75  –   1.99

Fail

Below   1.75

a.        
Mode of certification:
Please state name of awarding institution

Proposed: Ghana Institute of Management and Public Administration
(GIMPA)

2)           
Staffing:    

a.           
Provide information on
staffing for the programme in the table below (this should include only those
who have responded positively to appointment letters, or if existing staff,
have received letters for re-assignment or additional responsibilities):  

NAME

SEX

HIGHEST QUALIFICATION OBTAINED
AND PLACE

AREA OF SPECILISATION

RANK

FT/PT

SCHOOL OF BUSINESS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Details of staff development plan (if any) including
but not limited to the following:

i.          
Technical Assistance;

ii.        
Overseas training;

iii.       
Local training;

iv.       
Mentoring.

Educational and Technical support by foreign educational partners
provides for training, coaching and mentoring of all categories of staff.

1)           
Student Enrolment

 

Projected student enrolments for the next five (5) years in the
programme are as follows:

Academic Year

Year 1

Year 2

Year 3

Year 4

Year 5

Male

20

25

30

40

50

Female

25

30

40

50

60

Total

45

55

70

90

110

 

 1)            Resources

a.         Physical Resources:

Provide details of the available physical facilities including the following:

i.           classrooms, laboratories/demonstration rooms, studios and farms workshops and their respective capacities (as applicable);

ii.         Pieces of equipment, instruments and tools;

iii.        Provisions made for the physically challenged;

iv.        Safety facilities provided.

The School a large modern and newly built facility with all the comfort and conducive learning environment characteristic of contemporary best practice educational institutions.

           School of Public Policy and Entrepreneurship Development (SPPED) is located on xxxxxxxxx and can be accessed easily by means of transport.

           Premises cover 3,550 sq. meters of built areas (Ground floor, plus 4 floors, each of 750 sq meters conveniently partitioned; with the possibility to add 1 additional floor), with 65 parking spots available (and a possibility of expansion through neighbouring facilities)

           Lucas building has two private generators to support its activities at all times

           All floors are served by two elevators allowing easy access for physically challenged

           Building has a main access and emergency exit staircases; it is equipped with fire detectors and extinguishers

           Classrooms are large, well-lit naturally and by electrical fixtures; they include comfortable desks and chairs, LCD projection and modern boards. All parts of the building have air conditioning

           All sections of the building are covered with Wi-Fi for internet access to all students, faculty and administration

           Premises include a large number of classrooms, meeting rooms, cafeteria, private gym, dispensary, PC lab[U1] 

b.         Sources of information (e.g Library) and other relevant resources.

Physical library resources with the relevant reference materials will be stocked for easy access by the students. In addition the students will have an unlimited access to various e-libraries providing them with e-books and e-journals (see section B of NAB questionnaire).

2)            Student Learning Outcomes

Please state/list the student learning outcomes for the programme (i.e. the set of knowledge and skills a graduate of the programme should have)

The programme seeks to produce graduates who are: 

           Professionally skilled in the areas of concentration

           Should be multi-tasking

           Possess the analytical and critical thinking skills and capable of solving a wide range of business problems need to approach various types of challenging problems

           Be able to integrate readily into new task teams and foster team cohesion

           Morally sound and takes ethical decisions

           Be able to start own small business and nurture it to grow.

           Be able to pursue self-development and progression. .

 

3)            Sources of Funding for the programme

Please specify and state the amount involved in the following:

a.         External sources: College Owners’ Funds

b.         Internal (specify and state amount):

c.         Tuition fees (in Ghana Cedis) if applicable per student: all-inclusive tuition and fees in the range of 7,000 US$ (about 28,000 Ghana Cedis)[U2] , with financial programmes allowing needy students to benefit from full or partial scholarships.

 

Following the initial investment phase funded by the partners in the project, the financing of the educational group will come mostly from tuition, training fees and donations (owners and others). 

The tuition level would take into account the investments needed, as well as the cost of quality international education delivered in Ghana. Fees will also take into account comparable competitor’s tuition.

However, the university will endeavour significant efforts and initiatives to avoid becoming the educational recourse of an exclusive and small elite minority. It will partner with various public and private organizations in order to offer its education to the largest base of students and adults.

 

4)            Linkages

Linkages with other organisations/institutions (national/international) for academic or other forms of support


 [U1]Need to be edited

 [U2]Need tobe edited