Bachelor of Public Policy

BACHELOR'S DEGREE IN PUBLIC POLICY

1 Programme Aims

The main aim of the Bachelor of Science (BSc.) Public Policy  with concentration in Public Policy, Economic Policy Management and International Relations is to turn out graduates with very broad scope of knowledge and skills from the areas of business studies and public sector management in general whiles emphasizing Public Policy Management, Economic Policy Management and International Relations in the final stages of the programme. The aim is to ensure that the graduate has competencies that enable them fit well into various job situations confidently whiles having a thorough grounding in aspects of Public Policy Management, Economic Policy Management and International Relations practices. It is envisaged that graduates would have sound academic knowledge and skills as well as the required professional competencies for jobs in Business and Public Administration in general and the fields of Public Policy Management, Economic Policy Management and International Relations in particular. It is envisaged that during the programme of study, students will be provided with tools and techniques for engaging in policy analysis, formulation and implementation in a manner that equips him/her to be involved in policy processes in organisations and tool kits to guide practical application of modern policy concepts and choices at the work place.

In view of current international developments especially for Ghana which is surrounded by French speaking countries, and in order to develop the capability of the graduates to explore job opportunities in and around Ghana, the programme is designed to ensure all students acquire working knowledge and skills competencies in French and English in Levels 100 and 200 (L100 and L200).

The programme will impart relevant work experience to graduates during the four (4) years of training and education by ensuring that practical training, industrial attachment, internship, business, public policy and international relations seminars, among others, are mandatory. Special collaborations will be forged with relevant public, private and non-governmental organizations to facilitate the practical training for the students.

 6.2 Programme Objectives

The specific objectives of the Bachelor of Science (BSc.) Public Policy with concentration in Public Policy, Economics Economic Policy Management and International Relations as area of concentration are to:

  • Facilitate the acquisition of relevant knowledge, skills and attitudes required in business and public administration in general and in Public Policy, Economic Management and International Relations in particular so as to function effectively in the world of work.
  • Enable students situate Public Policy Management, Economic Policy Management and International Relations theories, principles and practices in the organizational development context and the specific roles that this function plays in achieving corporate goals and objectives.
  • Enable students integrate Public Policy Management, Economic Policy Management and International Relations knowledge with other core areas of business and public administration to develop the key competencies for either starting or managing small businesses.
  • Develop high ethically conscious professionals in Public Policy Management, Economic Policy Management and International Relations coupled with acumens in leadership that is required to lead business transformation and socio-economic development in Ghana.
  • Train students to acquire strategic thinking capacity in Public Policy Management, Economic Policy Management and International Relations and other core functional areas of Business and Public Administration so as to develop their problem-solving capacities as they enter businesses and organisations for work.
  • Capable of developing financial statements, budgets and making key financial decisions relating to management of small to medium enterprises.
  • Prepare the students for opportunities in entry-level positions in dynamic work environments and for academic advancement in Business and Public Administration.
  • Students’ admission, progression and graduation:

Clearly state the policies on minimum qualifications for admission into the programme, retention and graduation.

  1. Entry Requirements:

SSSCE Holders

Six (6) Credit passes or better including core English, Mathematics and either Integrated Science or Social Studies and three (3) electives in relevant subjects. Applicants should have an aggregate score of 6-24 in the West Africa Examination Council Examinations (Credit Passes (A-D) in six (6) subjects comprising three core subjects, including English language and Mathematics, plus three (3) relevant elective subjects).

WASSCE Applicants                                                      

Six (6) Credit passes or better including core English, Mathematics and either Integrated Science or Social Studies and three (3) electives in relevant subject. Applicant should have an aggregate score of 6 – 36 in the West Africa Examination Council Examinations (Credit Passes (A1-C6) in six (6) subjects comprising three core subjects, including English language and Mathematics, plus three (3) relevant elective subjects.)

GBCE Applicants

Credit passes (A-D) in six (6) subjects comprising three core subjects including English Language and Mathematics plus three (3) relevant elective subjects.  

A’ Level Holders

Five (5) Credit passes in GCE “O” Level Examination, including English Language and Mathematics and three (3) “A” Level passes in relevant subjects. A pass in the General paper required. Successful candidates for Business Administration and information Technology will be placed at Level 200. (Passes in three (3) subjects (at least, one of the passes should be grade D or better). Also, the applicant must have had credit passes (Grade 6) in five (5) GCE Ordinary level subjects including English Language, Mathematics and a science subject (for none-science students) and an Arts subject ( for science students).

ABCE Applicants

Full Diploma Certificate in ABCE: The applicant must have had credit passes in five (5) subjects including English Language, Mathematics, Integrated Science or Social Studies in the General Business Certificate Examination (GBCE) or Senior Secondary School Certificate Examination (SSSCE) or West African Senior Secondary School Certificate Examination (WASSCE). ABCE candidates may be considered for admission at level 200 of the degree programme.

 HND Holders

HND Holders with first class or second class upper desiring a top up in the same discipline shall be admitted to level 300. HND holders with second class lower or third class, regardless of discipline or those changing disciplines (regardless of the class obtained), shall be admitted into level 200. (Applicants must have graduated with a good HND certificates (i.e. at least second class lower division). In addition, the applicant must have acquired a 2-year post-HND qualification working experience).

Professional Certificate Holders

Applicants with following professional qualification shall be given direct admission to level 300:

·         Institute of Chartered Secretaries and Administration (ICSA) Professional Level

·         Institute of Human Resource Management Practitioners Ghana  (IHMRP) Professional Level

·         Applicants with following professional qualification shall be given direct admission to Level 200:

·         Institute of Chartered Secretaries and Administration (ICSA) Level One (1)

·         Institute of Human Resource Management Practitioners Ghana (IHRMP) Level One (1)

·         Chartered Institute of Administrators and Management Consultants (CIAMC) Part III

Mature Students 

MIUC also enrols matured students with work experience as follows:

  1. The applicant must be at least 25 years old, and show proof of age with birth certificate or any legitimate documentary proof of date of birth which is at least 5 years old at the time of application; 
  2. All applicants must pass Mature Students’ Entrance Examinations conducted by MIUC in (English Language, Mathematics and an Aptitude Test) for entry into all programmes at all level 100;  
  3. The applicant should show proof of passes in English Language and Mathematics in WASSCE
  4. Any other standard High School level examinations (for qualifications from countries outside WAEC’s aegis should be referred to the National Accreditation Board (NAB) for determination of equivalences and eligibility for admission.

FOREIGN QUALIFICATIONS

All foreign qualifications should be referred to the National Accreditation Board (NAB) for determination of equivalences and eligibility for admission to tertiary institutions in Ghana (National Accreditation Board Act, 2007 {Act744(2(2b)}).

Applicants may be invited to write an entrance examination and to attend a selection interview.

a)         Progression

Candidates may progress through the programme and complete successfully by passing all required courses and final Project Work. Generally, a student shall be put on probation for one year if he/she scores C grade in more than three (3) courses at any stage of the programme.  Candidates would be made to retake those courses.   If a student fails a course, he or she will have an opportunity to repeat the course. Failing the three (3) courses after retake will lead to dismissal. In all cases the student will be credited with the new grade after retake if he/she scores a better grade.

b)        Graduation

A student cannot be considered as having completed the programme if he or she has outstanding re-takes or has not fulfilled all other academic and financial requirements.  The requirements for graduation are as follows:

·                A final grade point average (FGPA) of at least 1.75.

·                Submission of three (3) copies of the Long Essay / Project Reports to the appropriate Co-ordinator of the School.

·                Completed a minimum of 120 credit hours over the 8 semesters.

·                All requirements for the programme will typically be completed within eight (8) continuous semesters. An extension of two semesters (in extenuating and special cases, a maximum of 4 semesters) is subject to approval by the Academic Board.

c)         Degree Awarded

Students will be awarded the degree of Bachelor of Business Administration after successfully completing the programme and meeting all requirements for graduation.

1)         Employment:

List the areas in which the students are likely to be employed

·                Private Sector (Local companies, multinational companies etc.)

·                Industry, Business, Commerce

·                Third Sector (Non-governmental organizations)

·                International Organizations (e.g., UNO, AU and their branches)

·                Public Sector (Government Ministries, agencies)

·                Graduates are also trained to start their own enterprises.

2)         Consultations:

State the levels of consultations for the design of the programme including consultations with the appropriate professional and/or relevant supervisory body where applicable

·                GIMPA Business School

·                Institute of Chartered Secretaries and Administration (ICSA) Ghana .

·                Institute of Human Resource Practitioners Ghana

·                Chartered Institute of Administrators and Management Consultants (CIAMC)

 

3)         Components of the programme:

Provide details of the curriculum and mode of delivery to include the following:

 

Each student must complete a programme of study made up of a minimum of forty-two (44) courses in four major components. Each course is allocated 3 credit hours except French I to French IV which have two (2) credit hours each and the Integrated Business Simulation which is allocated 1 credit hour. Each Credit hour represents the number of hours of contact (for teaching or supervision) between the lecturer and the student weekly for the entire semester including examination periods. Students are required to take all 44 courses (a minimum of 120 credits) over the eight (8) semesters to graduate.

 

Coding and numbering of courses of the BBA Programme

All courses in this programme use a combination of letters followed by numbers to create course codes. Codes beginning with four letters and followed by three digits.

The letters of the courses are as follows:

SPRC – School of PPED Required Course    

GBEC – General Business Education Course

HRCC – Human Resource Concentration Course

FMCC – Accounting and Financial Management Concentration Course

ETCC – Entrepreneurship Management Concentration Course

PTCC – Logistics and Supply Chain Management Concentration Course   

The first digit in the three sub-code refers to the academic level in which the course is offered. The third digit in the number code shall be defined as odd number for a course offered in the first semester and even number for a course offered in the second semester of the academic level under consideration.

Component 1

School of PPED Required Courses–SPRC – 11 Courses

29 Credits

SPRC101    

Learning Skills I

3 Credits

SPRC102   

Learning Skills II

3 Credits

SPRC103

French I

2 Credits

SPRC104    

French II

2 Credits

SPRC105    

Introduction to Social Psychology

3 Credits

SPRC106         

Introduction to Philosophy and Critical Thinking

3 Credits

SPRC201      

French III

2 Credits

SPRC202    

French IV

2 Credits

SPRC203     

Organisational Behaviour

3 Credits

SPRC301

Research Methods

3 Credits

SPRC302

Total Quality Management

3 Credits

Component 2

Core
Business Courses – GBEC – 25 Courses

76 Credits

GBEC101

Principles
of Economics (Micro & Macro)

3 Credits

GBEC102

Economy
of Ghana

3 Credits

GBEC103

Business
Mathematics

3 Credits

GBEC104    

Computer
Skills

3 Credits

GBEC201 

Quantitative
Methods for Business

3 Credits

GBEC202

Human
Resource Management

3 Credits

GBEC203

Principles
of Accounting I

3 Credits

GBEC204

Principles
of Accounting II

3 Credits

GBEC205

Principles
of Management

3 Credits

GBEC206

Principles
of Public Administration

3 Credits

GBEC208

Business
Law

3 Credits

GBEC301

Managerial
Economics

3 Credits

GBEC302    

Entrepreneurship

3 Credits

GBEC303

Marketing
Management

3 Credits

GBEC304

Managerial
Accounting

3 Credits

GBEC305

Operations
Management

3 Credits

GBEC306

Management
Information Systems

3 Credits

GBEC307     

Company
Law

3 Credits

GBEC308

Project
Management

3 Credits

GBEC401    

Financial
Management

3 Credits

GBEC402

Integrative
Business Simulation

1  Credit

GBEC403

Business
Planning

3 Credits

GBEC404

Performance
Management

3 Credits

GBEC405

Ethics
& Social Responsibility

3 Credits

GBEC406

Leadership

3 Credits

GBEC407

Strategic
Management

3 Credits

 

Component
3: CONCENTRATION AREA COURSES – ELECTIVES

HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT

Concentration Area
Courses – 6 courses

15 Credits

ACCOUNTING AND
FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT

Concentration Area
Courses – 6 courses

15 Credits

HRCC301

Training
and Development

3 Credits

FMCC301

Investment
and Portfolio Management

3 Credits

HRCC302

Recruitment
and Selection                                                        

3 Credits

FMCC302

Monetary
and Financial Systems                                                        

3 Credits

HRCC401

Employment
and Labor Law

3 Credits

FMCC401

Public
Finance

3 Credits

HRCC402

Human
Resource Development

3 Credits

FMCC402

Financial
Statement Analysis

3 Credits

HRCC404

Strategic
Human Resource Management

3 Credits

FMCC404

International
Trade Finance

3 Credits

 

 ENTREPRE-NEURSHIP

Concentration Area
Courses – 6 courses

12 Credits

 Logistics and Supply Chain Management

Concentration Area
Courses – 6 courses

15 Credits

ETCC301

Entrepreneurship
2: Managing Innovation

3 Credits

PTCC301

Public Procurement & Proc. Act 

3 Credits

ETCC302

Entrepreneurship
3: Key Skills for Business                                                        

3 Credits

PTCC302

Strategic
Supply Chain Management                                                        

3 Credits

HRCC401

Employment
and Labor Law

3 Credits

PTCC401

National
and International Negotiation

3 Credits

ETCC402

Entrepreneurship
5: Managing Businesses for High-Growth

3 Credits

PTCC402

International
Procurement

3 Credits

ETCC404

Entrepreneurship
6: Corporate Social Responsibility and Sustainable Business

3 Credits

PTCC404

e-Procurement
and e-Supply Chain

3 Credits

 

 

 

Component 4

Research
Project – 2 Courses

6 Credits

GBEC409

Long
Essay I /    Project I

3 Credits    

GBEC410

Long
Essay II / Project II

3 Credits    

 

 

 

 

Programme
Total: 44 Courses

126 Credits

NB: Each Level 400 candidate is supposed to take one elective course from any other area of concentration in the second semester.                                                 

d.         Research component

An integral part of the programme is for students to take a course in research methods and use the skill in business problem solving. The research skills will also be applied in specific course to complete practical and theoretical assignments in specific courses.

e.         Practical training, industrial attachment, internship, clinical experience, etc.

Although not a requirement for the degree, students will be encouraged to seek experiential exercises throughout the course of the programme

 

f.          Semester-by-semester structure/schedule of course, showing the credit value of each course

 

Each course has a credit value of three (3) except for French I to French IV which have two (2) credits hours each, and the Integrated Business Simulation which accounts for 1 credit hour. Courses offered from semesters 1 through 4 courses are common for all students.     

Semester 1

14 Credits

Semester 2

14 Credits

SPRC101

Learning
Skills I

SPRC102

Learning
Skills II

SPRC103

French
I

SPRC104

French II

SPRC105

Introduction
to Social Psychology

SPRC106

Introduction
to Philosophy & Critical Thinking

GBEC101

Principles
of Economics (Micro & Macro)

GBEC102

Economy
of Ghana

GBEC103

Business
Mathematics

GBEC 104

Computer Skills

 

 

 

 

Semester 3

14 Credits

Semester 4

14 Credits

SPRC201                          

French
III

SPRC202     

French
IV

SPRC203

Organisational
Behaviour

GBEC202

Human
Resource Management

GBEC201 

Quantitative
Methods for Business

GBEC204

Principles
of Accounting II

GBEC203

Principles
of Accounting I

GBEC206

Principles
of Public Administration

GBEC205

Principles
of Management

GBEC208

Business
Law

 

 

 

 

Semester 5

18 Credits

Semester 6

18 Credits

SPRC301

Research Methods

SPRC302

Total
Quality Management

GBEC301            

Managerial Economics

GBEC302               

Entrepreneurship 1

GBEC303

Marketing Management

GBEC304

Managerial Accounting

GBEC305

Operations Management

GBEC306

Management
Information Systems

GBEC307

Company Law

GBEC308

Project Management

HUMAN
RESOURCES CONCENTRATION/ ELECTIVES

 

 

 

HRCC301

Training
and Development

HRCC302

Recruitment
and Selection

ACCOUNTING
AND FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT CONCENTRATION ELECTIVES

 

 

 

FMCC301

Investment
and Portfolio Management

FMCC302

Monetary
and Financial Systems

ENTREPRENEURSHIP
CONCENTRATION ELECTIVES

 

 

 

ETCC301

Entrepreneurship
2: Managing Innovation

ETCC302

Entrepreneurship
3: Key Skills for Business

LOGISTICS
AND SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT CONCENTRATION/ ELECTIVES

 

 

 

PTCC301

Procurement
of Goods, Works and Services  

PTCC302

Strategic
Supply Chain Management

 

 

 

 

Semester 7

18 Credits

Semester 8

16 Credits

GBEC401

Financial
Management

GBEC402

Integrative
Business Simulation

GBEC403

 Business Planning

GBEC404

Performance Management

GBEC405

Ethics
& Social Responsibility

GBEC406

Leadership

GBEC407

Strategic Management

 

 

HUMAN
RESOURCES CONCENTRATION/ ELECTIVES

 

 

 

HRCC401

Employment
and Labour Law

HRCC402

Human
Resource Development

 

 

HRCC404

Strategic
Human Resource Management

ACCOUNTING
AND FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT  CONCENTRATION/
ELECTIVES

 

 

 

FMCC

Financial
Strategy for Public Managers

FMCC402

Financial
Statement Analysis

 

 

FMCC404

International
Trade Finance

ENTREPRENEURSHIP  CONCENTRATION ELECTIVES

 

 

 

HRCC401

Employment
and Labour Law

ETCC402

Entrepreneurship
5: Managing Businesses for High-Growth

 

 

ETCC404

Entrepreneurship
6: Corporate Social Responsibility and Sustainable Business

LOGISTICS
AND SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT 
CONCENTRATION/ ELECTIVES

 

 

 

PTCC401

National
and International Negotiation

PTCC402

International Procurement

 

 

PTCC404

e-Procurement
and e-Supply Chain

GBEC409    

Long
Essay I / Project I

GBEC410     

Long Essay II / Project II

 

 

ELECTIVE

One
Level 400 core subject from any other concentration areas

TOTAL PROGRAMME – 44
Courses

126 Credits

 1)           
Course Description:

Provide short descriptions of the content of the courses in the
programme to include:

a.           
Objective

b.           
Content

c.            
Mode of delivery

 

Courses

SPRC101

LEARNING SKILLS I         

3 CREDITS


Objective
:

At the end of the course the students would have been
able to improve their comprehension capacity for written and spoken language,
reading and writing skills, and be able to expand their vocabulary and develop
their critical thinking capabilities.

Content:

Students will be provided with three main areas of
learning in this course namely; Social skills and Confidence, Time Management,
and Writing Strategies. All this will combine to expose the student to study
habits, writing and listening skills, and oral and group presentations and the
ability to focus on research and Examinations

The content of this course includes, but not limited
to, the following:

·        
Life and learning skills required to become a
successful graduate.

·        
Working knowledge of the school’s environment.

·        
Preparation skills to meet the academic and practical
settings of the School.

·        
Non-academic issues to assist students’ transition to
the College.

·        
Writing and listening skills

·        
Oral and group presentation skills

·        
Writing Course Expectations

·        
rary Orientation; effective noteTaking Notes

·        
Writing Effective

·        
Sentences & Citation:

·        
Official Writing

·        
Preparing for tests and Examinations

·        
Time management

·        
Organizing and analyzing data

·        
Managing stress during examinations

·        
Making strong arguments

·        
Essay planning

·        
Using citations and references to summarize and
paraphrase

·        
Journal article referencing

·        
Quotations and in-text citations.

 

Mode
of Delivery
:

The mode of delivery will include but not limited to
lectures, class discussions, tutorials, story telling, Group Projects,
individual Presentations, Group Presentations case studies, taking turns to
read out loudly in class and class assignments.

Reading
Materials:

1.    Amazon
Digital Services LLC Learn Faster: Advanced Strategies On How to Learn Faster
and Better (Accelerated Learning – Brain Training – Memory Improvement –
Learning Techniques – Study Skills) Kindle Edition Jan, 2016

2.    Carter,
Carol J. & Bishop, Joyce (2014). Keys to effective learning: Study skills
and habits for success (6th Edition), Prentice Hall

3.    Frender,
Gloria 
Marta Drayton,
&
Janet November
(2013). Learning to learn (TRES) 3rd Edition: Incentive Publications by
World Book

4.    Frender,  Gloria Bosarge, Charlotte
&
Marta Drayton
(2016), Learning to learn: strengthening study skills and Brain
Power, 3rd Edition, Incentive Publications; 2003)

5.    Graff,
G., Birkenstein, C. (2019). They say, I say – The moves that matter in
academic Writing, New York: W.W. Norton & Company.

6.    Rosenwasser,
D., Stephen, J. (2011), Writing analytically, New York: Thomson Wadsworth

 

 

SPRC102

LEARNING SKILLS II    

3 CREDITS


Objective:

The
course builds on the Learning Skills I course. It would focus on student communication
and thinking skills for academic work and life. At the end of the course the
student should:

·        
Be able to sharpen their
skills to easily recall both spoken and written materials (recollection and
attentiveness skills), envisage concepts

·        
Be self-composed in high
stress situations such as in public speaking and examinations (relaxation
techniques), and be able to perceive themselves as effective learners;

·        
Communicate effectively in reading, comprehension,
speaking and writing.

Content:
                                                                             

The
student develop “word attack” skills, sound-symbol relationships, word roots
understanding, basic language patterns, verb endings, compound words, prefixes,
noun endings, suffixes, homonyms, homophones, vocabulary development, expansion
of vocabulary, new words (monosyllabic), reading comprehension skills, and word
order, meaning in context, ordering main events, remembering facts and details,
main idea, reading practice, successful small group discussions, level
advancement checks, timed readings, comprehension questions, synonyms,
recognize and pronounce words by applying word attack skills strategies; using
basic principles of phonetics, “connect” the relationship between sound and
symbols; sound out new words, recognize basic language patterns; recognize main
ideas, continuous improvement in reading rate, and comprehension through
advancing levels of selections.

Topics to be treated include: reading techniques –
context clues, scanning and skimming, reading for comprehension and information
details, drawing inferences and conclusions; summarizing and paraphrasing;  reading and interpreting non-prose forms of
writing; organizing information; writing phrases,  clauses; elements, structure, and principles
of construction of a sentence; parallelism; paragraphs and paragraphing; and
long essay construction. 

The students will learn to
differentiate between three types of questions – objective, factual, and
Academic works such as paper, term paper, report, thesis and final thesis,
annotation, abstract, review as well as their presentation belongs to the area
of scientific works; therefore they have to meet general requirements of
structure and content.

The
course is about theoretical requirements of writing and presentation to equip
students to effectively communicate in specific situations, which may include
various academic, professional, or civic situations. This will enable students
understand and respond appropriately to the critical elements that shape
communication situations, such as audience, purpose, and genre.

Mode of Delivery:

The
mode of delivery will include but not limited to lectures, class discussions,
case studies, story telling, taking turns to read loudly during lectures,
tutorials class debates and class assignments.

Reading Materials:

1. Amazon Digital Services LLC, (2019). Learn faster:
Advanced strategies on how to learn faster and better (Accelerated learning –
Brain training – memory improvement – Learning Techniques – Study
skills) Kindle Edition, 

2.
Carter, Carol J. & Bishop, Joyce (2014). Keys to effective
learning: Study skills and habits for success (6th Edition), Prentice Hall

3. Frender, Gloria Marta Drayton, & Janet November (2013). Learning to learn (TRES) 3rd Edition:
Incentive Publications by World Book

4.  Frender Gloria Bosarge, Charlotte & Marta Drayton  November (2003),
Learning to learn: strengthening study skills and Brain Power, 2nd
Edition, Incentive Publications; (2003)

5.
Graff, G., Birkenstein, C. May (2016). They say, I say – The moves
that matter in academic writing, New York: W.W. Norton & Company.

6.
Rosenwasser, D., Stephen, J. (2011), Writing analytically, New York:
Thomson Wadsworth.

 


SPRC103

FRENCH I

2 CREDITS


Objective:

This course introduces the students to basic skills in expressions in
French-language. At end of the course the student is able to speak and
understand simple French in daily situations. The student is also able to
develop communication skills in speaking, listening, reading, and writing in
modern standard French.

Content:

The course is in four parts. Part one is the introductory French. At
this level, students will be introduced to some basic expressions using basic
rules in the language. Students at this stage are encouraged to do more oral
practice and much more reading aloud. This will enable them to improve upon
their pronunciation and speaking. Some relevant topics to be treated at this
level will be on verb conjugation using the three tenses: present simple,
present perfect and future simple.

By the end of the course, students should be able to recognise basic
French expressions and vocabulary.

Topics to be covered include: French phonetics, sentence construction,
definite and indefinite articles, negative formation and verb conjugation.

Mode of Delivery:

Mode of delivery include in-class discussions, power point presentations, group discussions, use of computer applications and
demonstrations, which show real-life pronunciations and concepts.
Study resources that will be used include printed materials, Language
Lab Videos and Tapes that support self or independent study.

By the end of the course, students should be capable of using their
skills to express themselves in oral and in writing forms. 

Reading Materials:

  1. Valdman, A., Pons &  Scullen.  Chez  nous  (2014).  Branché  sur
     le  monde  francophone. Prentice  Hall   Paper
     Bound  with  Access  Card,
  1. Osei S. 2014. 
    An easy approach to French composition.  vol. 1 & 2  Trans afrique volume 1 & 2
    Speeddad
  1. Tsikpo T. (2010). Spear Guide to basic studies
    in French. Logiprint.
  1. Herraps (April 2012) Compact French Dictionary
    (English French) Spectrum Books
  1. Valdman, A., Pons &  Scullen.
     Chez  nous  (2014).
     Branché  sur  le  monde  francophone. Prentice
     Hall   Paper  Bound  with  Access  Card

 

 

SPRC104

FRENCH II

2 CREDITS

 

Objective: The course builds on the first semester’s course of Level 100 to further
develop the verbal and writing skills of students in French. 

 

Content:

Specific areas students will be exposed to include but not limited to:

  • Introduced to different forms of vocabularies in
    French language for everyday expressions.
  • Jargons in various occupational settings.
  • Reading Comprehension in French.
  • Les metiers-occupations
  • The use of subject and object pronouns in French
  • Comprehension ecrite and regular and irregular
    verbs.

 

Mode of Delivery:

Mode of delivery includes in-class discussions, power point presentations, group discussions, use of computer applications and
demonstrations, role playing which show real-life pronunciations and concepts.
Texts will be taken from reading text-books in French and students will be
coached to read such texts. Students will be required to orally answer text
book questions.

 

By the end of the course, students should be able to pronounce words,
use the right vocabulary and express themselves well by way of communicating
among themselves and other speakers of the language. 

 

Reading Materials:

1.        
Valdman, A., Pons &
 Scullen.  Chez  nous 
(2014).  Branché  sur
 le  monde  francophone.
Prentice
 Hall   Paper  Bound  with  Access  Card,  

2.        
Osei, S. (2014).  An easy
approach to French composition.
  vol.
1 & 2  Trans afrique volume 1 & 2
Speeddad

3.        
Tsikpo T. 2010. Spear guide to basic studies in French.
Logiprint.

4.        
Harraps (2007) Compact French Dictionary (English French) Spectrum
Books

5.        
Thomas, M. 2000.  French introductory course. Hodder
Education

6.        
Kurbegov E. 2011. Practice makes perfect basic French.
McGraw-Hill Education

 

 

SPRC105

INTRODUCTION TO
SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY

3 CREDITS

 

Objective:

At
the end of this course students can relate to the basic concepts and techniques
of modern behavioural patterns and settings and be able to describe or explain
the role of social psychology as a behavioural science.

 

Content:

Students will
understand how to conduct scientific study of human society relating to culture
and social interactions. Students will be thought how to make assumptions about
how people think and behave and use this understanding to in modelling
consumer decision-making process, in modelling voting behaviour politics and in
modelling rewards in personnel managemnet. Students would be thought how to use
such models to promote social, economic and political change and also explore
the sociology of Ghana.

 

Major topics:

·               
The process of learning
in relation to psychology and socialisation;

·               
Diversity and
inequality

·               
Cognitive psychology
(memory, language, intelligence reasoning and decision making);

·               
Development Psychology
(Physical and life plan, cognitive, and social)

·               
Neuroscience and
cognitive neuroscience);

·               
Social institutions,
social change, organisations, cooperation and sociology of Ghana

·               
Personality and social
psychology (Personality, social psychology, motivation and emotion)

·               
The
resolution of social problems (poverty and racism).

 

Mode of Delivery:

The content of this course will be
delivered through a combination of in-class lectures, tutorials and class
assignments simulation exercises and case studies.

 

Reading Materials:

 

  1. Macionis, John J. March (2017). Sociology (Global  Edition), Pearson
  1. Assimeng,
    J. M.(2006) Understanding society;
    an introduction to sociology for African students.
    Accra : Woeli
    Publishing Services,
  1. Assimeng,
    J. M 2nd Edition(2010). Religion
    and social change in West Africa: an introduction to the sociology of
    religion
    .Accra : Woeli Pub. Services,
  1. Vander
    Zanden, James Wilfrid.(1996). The
    social experience: an introduction to sociology.
    New York :
    McGraw-Hill
  1. Banaji, M.
    and Grenwwald, A. (2016) Hidden
    Biases of Good People
    . Bantam
  1. Benson, N.
    (2007). Psychology: A graphic
    guide to your mind and behaviour.
    Crow’s Nest, NSW: Allen &
    Unwin
  1. Breedlive,
    M. S. and Watson N. (January 2018). Biological
    Psychology: An introduction to Behavioural, cognitive and Clinical
    neuroscience
    7th Ed. Sinaeur and Associates
  1. Freud, S.
    (2010). Civilization and its Disconnects
    Discontents
    W.W Norton & Company.

 

 

SPRC106

INTRODUCTION TO
PHILOSOPHY AND CRITICAL THINKING

3 CREDITS

 

Objective:

At the end of this course students should be able to apply knowledge and
skills acquired to construct arguments and draw sound conclusions. Students become
analytical and critical in thinking relating to life issues business problem
solving.

 

Content:

The course discusses how words, language and knowledge can be employed
to make arguments, analyze assumptions and ascertain the validity of
conclusions. The course imparts skills for logical (inductive and deductive)
reasoning in a wide variety of business applications.

 

Major topics:

Specific topics include but not limited to:

  • Word and word understanding,
    framing of premises and conclusions, and methods of philosophy.
  • Surveys of the writings of a
    number of major historical figures in the fields. 
  • Introducing philosophers and
    problems from the individual, cooperate and national (Particularly
    developing countries) and ability to think critically about the issues
  • Distinction between logic,
    rhetoric and ranting,
  • Distinction between deductive
    and inductive arguments
  • Analysis of ambiguities and
    the nature of common fallacies in reasoning.
  • Symbolization and evaluation
    of deductive arguments using truth tables and the construction of proofs
    to assess validity.
  • Extensions of classical logic
    and fundamental issues pertaining to the nature of reasoning and logic in generally.

At end of the course, students should be able to think critically about
issues and ideas, analyse situations objectively and suggest solutions to life
and  business issues.

 

Mode of delivery:

The
content of this course will be delivered through a combination of in-class
lecturers, tutorials, cse studies, presentations, discussions and class assignments.

 

Reading Materials:

 

1. Bello, A.G.A. (2000). Introduction
to Logic
. Ibadan: University Press PLC

(Reference Unavailable)

2. Lauer, H.   and Amponsah, B.
(2013). Critical Thinking and Practical
Reasoning Course Reader
: Accra: Faculty of Arts, University of Ghana.

(Reference Unavailable)

3. Christensen, Kit R. (1999). Philosophy and Choice: Selected Readings
from around the World. Mountain View: Mayfield Publishing Company. (pp.
100-108).

4. Copi, I.M., & Cohen, Carl. (2008). Introduction to Logic. Upper
Saddle River: Pearson Education Inc.

 

5. Gyekye, Kwame. (2004). The Unexamined Life: Philosophy and the
African Experience. Accra: Sankofa Publishing Co. Ltd.

 

6. Miller, Miller E.D. L. (1999). Questions that Matter: An Introduction to
Philosophy. New York: Mc Graw Hill.

 

7.      Critical Thinking by Moore, Brooke Noel, Parker, Richard 10th (tenth)
Edition (2011)

8. New
York: McGraw Hill.

9.      Questions That Matter: An Invitation to Philosophy, Shorter Version Aug 2005

10.  Revel for Ethics: Theory and Practice, Updated Edition — Access Card
(11th Edition)
May 2016 


GBEC101

PRINCIPLES OF
ECONOMICS (MICRO & MACRO)

3 CREDITS

 

Objective:

This
course builds the knowledge of students with the basic micro and macro-economic
concepts, principles and theories necessary for the economic analysis of
problems so as to offer cost effective solutions.

 

Content:

The
specific topics to be discussed from the micro economic aspect include but noy
limited to:

  • Basic concepts, principles and theories of micro
    and macro economics.
  • Rational economic behaviour of the consumer and
    the nature of demand curves.
  • Equilibrium of the firm and the behaviour of the
    different types of markets in allocating scarce resources
  • Fundamental operations of markets (Scarcity and
    choice, economic systems Demand and supply, price, income and cross price
    elasticities, Consumer behaviour, theory of the firm, cost curves, profit
    maximization, market structure: perfect competition and monopoly and
    imperfect competition).

From the macroeconomic aspects the following topics will be treated:

  • Classical and Keynesian macroeconomics,
  • Components of aggregate demand, national income
    determination, national income measurement and uses
  • Sectoral contribution (agriculture, industry and
    services) to the Gross Domestic Product (GDP) of Ghana,
  • Fiscal and monetary policies, inflation, unemployment
    and external trade of Ghana.

Mode of Delivery:

The course will
be delivered through in-class lectures/PowerPoint presentations, case studies, class
and group discussions.

Reading
Materials:

  1. Lipsey, R. & Chry, A (January 2018). Economics, 13th Edition, Oxford: Oxford
    University Press.
  1. Marshall, A (2016). Principles of economics, London: MacMillan & Co
  1. Rittenberg, L. & Tregarthen, T
    (2012). Principles of
    microeconomics
    , Carolina: Carolina University
  1. Samuelson, P. A. (4th Edition April 2006).
    Economics, Boston: McGraw-Hill
  1. Stiglitz, J. E. & Walsh, C. E (2006).
    Economics, 4th
    Edition – New York: W. W. Norton & Company
  1. Ahiawodzi,
    A. K. (2013). Macroeconomics,
    Accra: Sahabia Publication.
  1. Bade, R.
    & Parkin, M. 8th Edition (Jan 2017). Foundations of macroeconomics, Boston: Pearson Addison
    Wesley.
  1. Bawumia, M. (2010).
    Monetary policy and financial sector reforms in Africa, Ghana’s
    experience,
    Accra. Combert Impressions Ghana Ltd
  1. Mankiw, N.
    G (2014). Macroeconomics,
    Boston: South-Western College
  1. Killick, T. (2010). Development
    economics in action: A study of economic policies in Ghana
    ,Oxford:
    Routhledge
  1. ISSER (2014).The state of
    Ghanaian economy
    , ISSER: University of Ghana, Legon                       
  1. Stockman (2012). Introduction to Macroeconomics, Boston: South-Western
    College


GBEC102

ECONOMY OF GHANA

3 CREDITS


Course Objective:
This course aims at making students acquire basic
understanding of the Ghanaian economy.

Content:

This
course analyses and discusses key aspects of the Economy of Ghana in relation
to policy formulation implementation and the impacts realized 

Topics to be covered include but not limited to the following:

  • Introduction
    and Overview of the Economy of Ghana
  • The
    Financial Sector and Inflation    
  • Economic
    Planning                
  • Sustainable
    Development/Environment        
  • Structural Adjustment
  • Employment               
  • Poverty
    and Income Distribution
  • The
    Economic Sectors and their relative performance
  • SWOT
    Analysis of the Economy of Ghana

Reference Text:

Reference materials include but not
limited to the following:

  1. ISSER (various issues). The
    State of the Ghanaian Economy Report. Legon: ISSER.
  2. Killick, Tony (2010).
    Development Economics in Action: A study of Economic Policies in Ghana, 2nd
    edition. London and New York: Routledge.
  3. Aryeetey, E., Harrigan, J.
    & Nissanke, M. (2000). Economic Reforms in Ghana: The Miracle and the
    Mirage. Oxford: James Currey.
  4. Other useful resources
    include the following websites:
  5. The Bank of Ghana www.bog.gov.gh
  6. Ghana Statistical Service www.statsghana.gov.gh
  7. World Bank, Ghana Office www.worldbank.org/en/country/ghana
  8. International Monetary
    Fund, Ghana Office www.imf.org/external/country/gha/
  9. Relevant Government of
    Ghana Ministries/Departments/Agencies via www.ghana.gov.gh

 

 GBEC103

BUSINESS MATHEMATICS

3 CREDITS


Objective:

At
the end of the programme students will develop their mathematical skills
requiredy for analyzing numerical information to understand the veracity of
business problems and to suggest objective solutions.

Content:

In
this course the quantitative analytical knowledge, skills and attitudes will be
imparted to the students so that these could be applied in business problem
solving and decision making.

Topics
to be treated include but not limited to the following:

  • Applications of ratio and proportion,
  • Computing taxes,
  • Commercial discounts
  • Simple and compound interest,
  • Annuities
  • Debt reduction
  • Sinking funds,
  • Capitalization and wasting of assets
  • Stocks and bonds,
  • Numeric and algebraic
    basicsAlgebraic forms and functions
  • Quadratic and other
    functions;
    and graphs.

Students
are expected to be able to apply basic quantitative skills to making business
decision.

Mode of Delivery:

Learning will be facilitated through class discussions, power point presentations, group discussions, use of computer applications, demonstrations and simulations, which show real-life application of mathematical concepts related to business situations, assignments and problem solving.

 

Reading Materials:

1.         Andy A. Francis (2004). Business mathematics and statistics Thomson Learning London.

2.         Deitz James E. & Southam James L (2016). Contemporary Business Mathematics for Colleges, 17th Edition Cengage Brain  San Francisco.ISBN-10: 1305506685  |  ISBN-13: 9781305506688

3.         Eccles P. (1998) An Introduction to Mathematical Reasoning Cambridge University Press

4.         Williams, Walter E. (1987) Fundamentals of business mathematics W.C. Brown Dubuque, Iowa

5.         Weber, Jean E. (1982). Mathematical analysis; business and economic applications. 3rd Ed. Harper and Row. New York

6.         Wheeler, Ruric E (1986) Modern mathematics with applications to business and the social sciences Brooks Cole Publications Co. Monterey, California

 

 

 

GBEC104

COMPUTER SKILLS

3 CREDITS

 

Objective:

This course equips students with the knowledge and skills to use computers and apply information technology in different settings of work and studies.  The focus of the course is to prepare students to use computer and information technology effectively in undertaking their studies.  The course is designed to offers students “hands on” experience. The course further provides students with the knowledge of using software applications in office environments or in work settings.

 

Content:

The course is designed into two parts all aimed at introducing students to the basic components of a computer system and their application. The first part deals with the overview of the information Technology field. Topics covered include but not limited to:

  • Basic Introduction to Computers (History and architecture),
  • Types and applications of computer software
  • Introduction to operating systems (DOS, Windows [File Organization and System] and others).

 

The part two prepares students with hands-on experiential learning to be able to use office productivity tools, which include, but not limited to:

  • Word processing, use of spreadsheet and presentation tools.
  • Microsoft Office or any other open source productivity tools (Open Office).

 

At the end of the course, students are expected to acquire a good knowledge about computing which prepares them for taking higher Computer Science/IT courses whiles applying the skills for academic course work.

 

Mode of Delivery:

The Course will be delivered through lectures/power point presentations, individual and group assignments and practical computer lab sessions.

 

 

 

Reading Materials:

1.    Reed, D. (2010). Balanced Introduction to computer science, A: International Version, Pearson Higher Education.

2.    Goldschlager, L. (1988). Computer science: A Modern introduction, Prentice Hall; 2 edition

3.    Thareja R. 2nd Edition (October 2019). Fundamentals of computers, Oxford Press, ISBN 9780199452729

4.    Sedgewick, R. and Wayne, K. (June 2016). An introduction to computer science. Princeton.

5.    Weverka, P.2016. Microsoft Office (2016),  All-in-one for dummies. John Willey and Sons. ISBN 13978-1119083122

 

 

 

 

SPRC201

FRENCH III

2 CREDITS

 

Objective:

This course builds on French II and the objective is to develop the communication skills of the student to use expressions relating to various situations in life. The course is to enable students improve on their sentence construction capabilities.

 

Content:                     

Topics include but not limited to:

  • Social, economic, political and geographical situations discussed in French. Grammar and constructional works will be more dealt with.
  • Tenses in French language.
  • Mon Ecole’’- Identifying subjects taught at Schools and time Frames or periods
  • Mon village’’- identifying the right locations and important landmarks.
  • Art of reading in French

 

Mode of Delivery:

Mode of delivery include lectures, class discussions, assignments and power point presentations, group discussions, use of computer applications and audio and video demonstrations that illustrate real-life pronunciations and concepts. Learners will be coached to read more from relevant text-books newspapers, magazines and journals in French.

 

Reading Materials:

1.    Valdman, A., Pons & Scullen.  Chez  nous  (2019).  Branché  sur  le  monde  francophone. Prentice  Hall   Paper  Bound  with  Access  Card,  

2.    Osei S. 2014.  An easy approach to French composition, vol. 1 & 2  Trans afrique volume 1 & 2 Speeddad

3.    Tsikpo T. 2010. Spear Guide to basic studies in French. Logiprint.

4.    Harraps(2007). Compact French dictionary (English French). Spectrum Books

5.    Thomas, M. 2000.  French introductory course. Hodder Education

6.    Kurbegov E. February 2017. Practice makes perfect basic French. McGraw-Hill Education

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SPRC202

FRENCH IV

2 CREDITS

 

Objective:

This course builds on French III to further enhance the French communication skills of students. It builds the grammar, pronunciation, oral comprehension, speaking reading, and writing competencies of the student.

 

Content:

Student builds on earlier courses in French to be able to undertake more advanced studies in French. Essays and other forms of compositions are thought to the student. Students will be engaged rigorously to make presentations on diverse issues in French.

Topics to be covered include but not limited to:

Articles, direct and indirect object pronouns, imperfect construction, and conditional tenses, past simple tenses, relative pronouns, report writing and Reading comprehension.

 

Mode of Delivery:

Facilitation methods include lectures, class discussions, assignments and power point presentations, group discussions, use of computer applications and illustrations of practical pronunciations and concepts.

 

Reading Materials:

1. Valdman, A., Pons & Scullen.  Chez nous (2014).  Branché sur le monde francophone. Prentice-Hall   Paper  Bound  with  Access  Card,  

2. Osei S. 2014.  An easy approach to French composition.  vol. 1 & 2 Trans afrique volume 1 & 2 Speeddad

3. Tsikpo T. (2010). Spear Guide to basic studies in French. Logiprint.

4. Harraps (2007) Compact French dictionary (English French) 2007. Spectrum Books

5. Thomas, M. (2000).  French introductory Course. Hodder Education

6. Kurbegov E. (February 2017). Practice makes perfect basic French. McGraw-Hill Education 2nd Edition

 

 

SPRC203

ORGANISATIONAL BEHAVIOUR

3 CREDITS

 

Objective:

The main purpose of this course is to enable students grasp the concepts of causes and effects of human behaviour and actions at the workplace and to understand how such knowledge can be used subsequently to moderate behaviour. This course sets the foundation pillars of management.

 

Content:

The course draws from social science disciplines of Psychology, Politics, Sociology and Economics and adopts interdisciplinary approach to develop of theories that facilitate empirical research relating to human behaviour in organisations.

The specific topics discussed in this course include but not limited to the following:

  • The Nature of organisational Behaviour: Approaches to Organisation and Management;
  • The Nature and Context of Organisations;
  • Individual Differences and Diversity;
  • The Nature of Learning;
  • Perception and Communication;
  • Work Motivation,
  • Morale and Job Satisfaction;
  • The Nature of Work Groups and Teams;
  • Working in Groups and Teams;
  • The Nature of Leadership,
  • Structures of Organisations;
  • Organisational Control and Power; membership conflict and cooperation;
  • organisational culture, change and development;
  • Impact of technology on organisations;
  • Personnel psychology;
  • Bargaining behaviour and group dynamics;
  • Society, the worker and work environment

 

Mode of Delivery:

The content of this course will be delivered through a combination of case studies, in-class lecturers, assignments, power-point presentations and discussions, and research projects.

 

Reading Materials:

1.         Du Brin, A. J. (2005). Fundamentals of organizational behaviour (3rded.). South-Western Cengage Learning

2.         Knights, D. & Willmott, H. (2007). Organisational Bebaviour & Management. Cengage Learning EMEA

3.         Mullins, L. J. (2007). Management and organizational Behaviour (8th ed.). Milan: RotolitoLombarda.

4.         Mullins, L. J. (2013). Management & organisational behaviour 10th Edition, Pearson Education Limited, Edinburgh Gate Harlow, UK

5.         Nelson, D. L., & Quick, J. C. (2006). Organizational behaviour: Foundations, realities & challenges (5th ed.). China: South- Western Corporation.

6.         Robbins, S. P., Judge, T. A., & Sanghi, S. (2009). Organizational behaviour (13th ed.). New Delhi: Pearson Prentice Hall.

 

 

GBEC201

QUANTITATIVE METHODS FOR BUSINESS

3 CREDITS

 

Objective:

To develop the quantitative analytical skills of the student for business decision-making.

 

Content: 

 

This course is designed to enable students to apply statistics and mathematics models to solve business and operations problems. The course integrates applied business research and descriptive statistics.

 

Topics that will be discussed include but not limited to:

·         Time series analysis

·         Methods of statistical inference including confidence intervals

·         Hypothesis testing

·         Statistical regression and correlation.

 

Mode of Delivery:

Mode of delivery include  lectures, plenary class discussions, power point presentations, group discussions, use of computer programmes and other applications and illustrations to depict real-life application of quantitative techniques in business and operational situations.

 

 

 

Reading Materials:

1.    Anderson, David R. (David Ray), (February 2015). Quantitative methods for business. Mason, Ohio : Thomson/South-Western

2.    Bharat Kolluri Michael J. Panik Rao N. Singamsetti (July 2016). Introduction to quantitative methods in business with applications using Microsoft Excel Wiley SBN 978-1-119-22097-8

3.    Dennis J. Sweeney,& Thomas A Williams (January 2018). Quantitative methods for business 15th Ed Cengage Learning India

4.    Barry Render, Ralph M. Stair, Michael E. Hanna (2014). Quantitative analysis for management and student CD-ROM, Eighth Edition Publisher: Prentice Hall.

5.    Brandimarte, Paolo (2013). Quantitative methods : an introduction for business management  Hoboken, N.J. : Wiley,

6.    Buglear, John. (2015). Quantitative methods for business : the A to Z of QM.Oxford : Butterworth-Heinemann,

7.    Curwin, Jon. (2008). Quantitative methods for business decisions. London : Thomson Learning. 

8.    Louise Swift, Sally Piff (2014). Quantitative methods for business, management and finance 4th Ed. Palgrave Macmillan.

 

 

 

 

 

GBEC202

HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

3 CREDITS

 

Objective:

At the end of the course, students should be able to understand the complex decisions that all managers make in performing the HR function in a dynamic and exciting work environment and how such decision support or inhibit labour productivity.

 

Students will be exposed to concepts, principles, processes, and contemporary challenges in human resource management.

 

Content:

This course exposes students to concepts and application areas of Human Resources Management (HR). It explores how the interdependence of the major topics in HR are created and implemented. 

 

Topics that will be discussed include:

·         HR concepts, principles, and processes

·         Introduction to HRM

·         Organizational Structure and HRM

·         Job Analysis and Design

·         Recruitment Selection

·         Managing Careers

·         Performance Appraisal

·         Employment Relationships and the Law

·         Performance Management

·         Compensation and Benefits

·         Managing Employees for Competitive Advantage

·         Organizational Demands and Environmental Influences;

·         Legal Compliance

·         Employee Benefits

·         Health, and Wellness

·         Labor Unions and Industrial Relations

 

Mode of Delivery:

The course will be delivered through in-class lectures, discussions, case studies and group and individual assignments.

 

Reading Materials:

1.    Banfield Paul, & Kay Rebecca (April 2018) Introduction to human resources management   Oxford University Press.

2.    Phillips, J, & Gully, S. (January 2018). Human Resource Management. Mason, OH: South-Western

3.    Martin, Graeme, (March 2016) Managing people and organisations in changing context. Oxford: Elsevier

4.    Steen, S., Noe, R., Hollenbeck, J., Gerhart, B., & Wright, P. (2013). Human Resource Management (3rd Canadian Ed.). Toronto: McGraw Hil

5.    Stredwick, John. (July 2013) An introduction to human resource management. London: Elsevier Butterworth-Heinemann

6.    Laroche, Lionel. (2007) Recruiting, retaining, and promoting culturally different employees, Amsterdam; Boston: Elsevier Butterworth-Heinemann,

 

 

 

GBEC203

PRINCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING I

3 CREDITS

 

Objective:

At the end of this course, students are expected to have a solid base in basic accounting concepts and principles and to be enriched in all the fundamental principles of financial accounting in relation to simple business entities.

 

Content:

Topics to be discussed include but not limited to:

  • Basic accounting concepts
  • Principles of double-entry accounting technique
  • Preparation of basic financial statements for single entities.

 

Mode of Delivery:

The course will be facilitated in as practical manner as possible. A combination of lecturers, tutorials, case studies, class assignments and presentations will constitute some of the modes of delivery of the course.

 

Reading Materials:

1.    Collins, S. M. H (2007). Dictionary of accounting, London: A &C Black

2.    Weygandt and Kieso (January 2018). Accounting Principles 10th edition

3.    Wood and Sangster and Sangster (June 2018). Frank Wood’s business accounting   

   2, Volume 2

4.    Wood, Frank et. al. (January 2018). Frank Wood’s business accounting, Vol1 &2,

   Volume one, London: Pearson

5.    Weetman, P (March 2019). Financial and management accounting: an introduction,

   London: Pearson.

 

 

 

 

                                                                                

GBEC204

PRINCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING II

3 CREDITS

 

Objective:

At end of the course, the students will have a solid foundation in basic accounting concepts and principles and would appreciate the role of the accounting process and how it is used to monitor and report the financial performance of a firm or organization. It builds on Principles of Accounting I

 

Content:

The topics are a continuation of the previous accounting course in a slightly advanced manner and include but not limited to:

  • Principles and concepts relating to financial accounting
  • Double-entry accounting technique
  • Preparation of financial statements for single entities. This stage of the course is very important and therefore should be made as practical as possible.

 

Mode of Delivery:

The course will be facilitated in as practical manner as possible. A combination of lecturers, tutorials, case studies, class assignments and presentations will constitute some of the modes of delivery of the course.

 

Reading Materials:

1.    Collins, S. M. H (2007). Dictionary of accounting, London: A &C Black

2.    Weygandt and Kieso (January 2018). Accounting Principles 10th edition

3.    Wood and Sangster and Sangster (June 2018). Frank Wood’s business accounting 2, Volume 2

4.    Wood, Frank et. al. (January 2018). Frank Wood’s business accounting, Vol1 &2, Volume one, London: Pearson

5.    Weetman, P (March 2019). Financial and management accounting: an introduction, London: Pearson.

 

 

GBEC205

PRINCIPLES OF MANAGEMENT

3 CREDITS

 

Objective:

To aim is to develop the managerial knowledge and skills of the students and prepare them for taking and executing such responsibilities in the life’s career. The course creates awareness among the students that nothing meaningful can be achieved by an organization without effective and efficient management.  Students will learn concepts and practices associated with managing people and organisational dynamics in relation to private business.

 

Content:

Topic to be covered include but not limited to:

·                The concept of management, functions and principles.

·                Theories of management

·                Private Business organisations, their establishment and how they grow

·                Management of Private business organisations

·                Elements of human Behaviour in businesses organisations

·                Managing Diversity

 

Mode of Delivery:

The mode of delivery includes, but is not limited to, in-class lectures, case studies, practical assignments, simulations, and seminar presentations.

 

Reading Materials:

1.         Cole, G. (2004). Management Theory and Practice. 6th Edition. London Cengage Learning

2.         Robbins, S. & Coulter, M. (2016). Management, Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson.

3.         Nahavandi, A., Denhardt, R., Denhardt, J., & Aristigueta, M. (2015). Organizational behaviour. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.

4.         Clegg Steward R.; Hardy Cynthia, and Nord Walter R. (1999) Managing Organisations, Current Issues, SAGE Publications Ltd.

5.         Kirton, Gill. (2010) The dynamics of managing diversity: a critical approach, Burlington: Elsevier.

6.         Martin, Graeme, (March 2016). Managing people and organisations in changing context. Oxford Elsevier.

7.         Robbins S.P. & Judge, T.A. (2010): Organizational Behaviour: International version, 14th ed.: Pearson International.

8.         Aristigueta, M. (2015). Organisational behaviour. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications. 

 

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Ut elit tellus, luctus nec ullamcorper mattis, pulvinar dapibus leo.